The Countryman

Reading experience

?itemComments

The Countryman

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-31755

Evidence

"Meeting held at Frensham, Northcourt Avenue. 13th Sept. 1940<br/> Howard R. Smith in the Chair. <br/> [...] <br/> 7. F. E. Pollard commenced the main business of the evening. This was to consist of readings of passages from books we had read during the year. F. E. was sorry but he was afraid he had read nothing recently which was intellectually suitable for the Club. (Cheers) He would however read from The Mill on the Floss. This proved to be a diverting dissertation on the Commercial Traveller who seems to have altered little since George Eliot’s day except in the article for sale for vacuum cleaners were conspicuous by their absence. <br/> 8. “The Seven Chars of Chelsea” by Celia Fremlin was the choice of Dorothea Taylor who warned us that it was an impalatable book. She must have read from the more tasty portions for we were entertained by the Margretian Charic conversation conversation which took place among the other six when the author joined their ranks and by the description of a very tasty cup of tea. Dr Taylor finished with a more serious passage on the difficulty of mistress and maid belonging to two completely different worlds. <br/> 9. Muriel Stevens read us a descriptive passage from “The Countryman”. We found that one should live in Corsica to appreciate the punctuality of our G.P.O. <br/> 10. Our adventurous evening took an astronomical turn while we heard from Howard Smith of the Herschels at Slough, their 40 foot telescope and the discovery of the planet Uranus. This was from Cecil Robert’s book “And so to Bath.” <br/> 11. Violet Clough then brought us nearer home by way of China in several extracts from “Four Part Setting” by Ann Bridge<s>s</s>. <br/> 12. A. B. Dilks recommended us to read some or all of The Bases of Modern Science by J. W. W. Sullivan, published in the Pelican Series at 6d. <br/> 13. Rosamund Wallis found her bookmark more interesting than her book and read us an entertaining but pathetic letter from a refugee now in New York. His subject was the interesting one of the R[h]ythm of Glass Washing in an American Hotel. <br/> <br/> [signed by:] R. D. L. Moore <br/> Oct. 18. 1940."

Source


Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Stevens, Muriel
Born in ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
January 1 - September 13 1940
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
An earlier reading during 1940: see Minute 7.<br/> Material by kind permission of the XII Book Club. For further information and permission to quote this source, contact the Reading Experience Database (http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/reading/contacts.php).

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:


http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/96483
Accessed on 2020/01/28 11:22:11

Related place
England
Related people
Stevens, Muriel
Related place
England
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              <author>Bruce Dilks</author>
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          <ptr target="ukred-31755">"Meeting held at Frensham, Northcourt Avenue. 13th Sept. 1940&lt;br/&gt;
	Howard R. Smith in the Chair. &lt;br/&gt;
[...] &lt;br/&gt;
7. F. E. Pollard commenced the main business of the evening. This was to consist 
of readings of passages from books we had read during the year. F. E. was sorry 
but he was afraid he had read nothing recently which was intellectually suitable for 
the Club. (Cheers) He would however read from The Mill on the Floss. This proved 
to be a diverting dissertation on the Commercial Traveller who seems to have 
altered little since George Eliot’s day except in the article for sale for vacuum 
cleaners were conspicuous by their absence. &lt;br/&gt;
8. “The Seven Chars of Chelsea” by Celia Fremlin was the choice of Dorothea 
Taylor who warned us that it was an impalatable book. She must have read from 
the more tasty portions for we were entertained by the Margretian Charic 
conversation conversation which took place among the other six when the author 
joined their ranks and by the description of a very tasty cup of tea. Dr Taylor 
finished with a more serious passage on the difficulty of mistress and maid 
belonging to two completely different worlds. &lt;br/&gt;
9. Muriel Stevens read us a descriptive passage from “The Countryman”. We found 
that one should live in Corsica to appreciate the punctuality of our G.P.O. &lt;br/&gt;
10. Our adventurous evening took an astronomical turn while we heard from 
Howard Smith of the Herschels at Slough, their 40 foot telescope and the 
discovery of the planet Uranus. This was from Cecil Robert’s book “And so to 
Bath.” &lt;br/&gt;
11. Violet Clough then brought us nearer home by way of China in several extracts 
from “Four Part Setting” by Ann Bridge&lt;s&gt;s&lt;/s&gt;. &lt;br/&gt;
12. A. B. Dilks recommended us to read some or all of The Bases of Modern 
Science by J. W. W. Sullivan, published in the Pelican Series at 6d. &lt;br/&gt;
13. Rosamund Wallis found her bookmark more interesting than her book and read 
us an entertaining but pathetic letter from a refugee now in New York. His subject 
was the interesting one of the R[h]ythm of Glass Washing in an American Hotel. 
&lt;br/&gt; &lt;br/&gt;

[signed by:] R. D. L. Moore &lt;br/&gt;
Oct. 18. 1940."</ptr>
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?itemComments

The Countryman

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-31755

Evidence

"Meeting held at Frensham, Northcourt Avenue. 13th Sept. 1940<br/> Howard R. Smith in the Chair. <br/> [...] <br/> 7. F. E. Pollard commenced the main business of the evening. This was to consist of readings of passages from books we had read during the year. F. E. was sorry but he was afraid he had read nothing recently which was intellectually suitable for the Club. (Cheers) He would however read from The Mill on the Floss. This proved to be a diverting dissertation on the Commercial Traveller who seems to have altered little since George Eliot’s day except in the article for sale for vacuum cleaners were conspicuous by their absence. <br/> 8. “The Seven Chars of Chelsea” by Celia Fremlin was the choice of Dorothea Taylor who warned us that it was an impalatable book. She must have read from the more tasty portions for we were entertained by the Margretian Charic conversation conversation which took place among the other six when the author joined their ranks and by the description of a very tasty cup of tea. Dr Taylor finished with a more serious passage on the difficulty of mistress and maid belonging to two completely different worlds. <br/> 9. Muriel Stevens read us a descriptive passage from “The Countryman”. We found that one should live in Corsica to appreciate the punctuality of our G.P.O. <br/> 10. Our adventurous evening took an astronomical turn while we heard from Howard Smith of the Herschels at Slough, their 40 foot telescope and the discovery of the planet Uranus. This was from Cecil Robert’s book “And so to Bath.” <br/> 11. Violet Clough then brought us nearer home by way of China in several extracts from “Four Part Setting” by Ann Bridge<s>s</s>. <br/> 12. A. B. Dilks recommended us to read some or all of The Bases of Modern Science by J. W. W. Sullivan, published in the Pelican Series at 6d. <br/> 13. Rosamund Wallis found her bookmark more interesting than her book and read us an entertaining but pathetic letter from a refugee now in New York. His subject was the interesting one of the R[h]ythm of Glass Washing in an American Hotel. <br/> <br/> [signed by:] R. D. L. Moore <br/> Oct. 18. 1940."

Source


Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Stevens, Muriel
Born in ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
January 1 - September 13 1940
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
An earlier reading during 1940: see Minute 7.<br/> Material by kind permission of the XII Book Club. For further information and permission to quote this source, contact the Reading Experience Database (http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/reading/contacts.php).

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:


http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/96483
Accessed on 2020/01/28 11:22:11

Related place
England
Related people
Stevens, Muriel
Related place
England
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        <p>
          <ptr target="ukred-31755">"Meeting held at Frensham, Northcourt Avenue. 13th Sept. 1940&lt;br/&gt;
	Howard R. Smith in the Chair. &lt;br/&gt;
[...] &lt;br/&gt;
7. F. E. Pollard commenced the main business of the evening. This was to consist 
of readings of passages from books we had read during the year. F. E. was sorry 
but he was afraid he had read nothing recently which was intellectually suitable for 
the Club. (Cheers) He would however read from The Mill on the Floss. This proved 
to be a diverting dissertation on the Commercial Traveller who seems to have 
altered little since George Eliot’s day except in the article for sale for vacuum 
cleaners were conspicuous by their absence. &lt;br/&gt;
8. “The Seven Chars of Chelsea” by Celia Fremlin was the choice of Dorothea 
Taylor who warned us that it was an impalatable book. She must have read from 
the more tasty portions for we were entertained by the Margretian Charic 
conversation conversation which took place among the other six when the author 
joined their ranks and by the description of a very tasty cup of tea. Dr Taylor 
finished with a more serious passage on the difficulty of mistress and maid 
belonging to two completely different worlds. &lt;br/&gt;
9. Muriel Stevens read us a descriptive passage from “The Countryman”. We found 
that one should live in Corsica to appreciate the punctuality of our G.P.O. &lt;br/&gt;
10. Our adventurous evening took an astronomical turn while we heard from 
Howard Smith of the Herschels at Slough, their 40 foot telescope and the 
discovery of the planet Uranus. This was from Cecil Robert’s book “And so to 
Bath.” &lt;br/&gt;
11. Violet Clough then brought us nearer home by way of China in several extracts 
from “Four Part Setting” by Ann Bridge&lt;s&gt;s&lt;/s&gt;. &lt;br/&gt;
12. A. B. Dilks recommended us to read some or all of The Bases of Modern 
Science by J. W. W. Sullivan, published in the Pelican Series at 6d. &lt;br/&gt;
13. Rosamund Wallis found her bookmark more interesting than her book and read 
us an entertaining but pathetic letter from a refugee now in New York. His subject 
was the interesting one of the R[h]ythm of Glass Washing in an American Hotel. 
&lt;br/&gt; &lt;br/&gt;

[signed by:] R. D. L. Moore &lt;br/&gt;
Oct. 18. 1940."</ptr>
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