The Better Part

Reading experience

?itemComments

The Better Part

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-31622

Evidence

"Meeting held at 72 Shinfield Road. 5th May 1941<br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;A. G Joselin in the chair. <br/> <br/> [...]<br/> <br/> 5. F. E. Pollard then undertook to guide us through “the moon-silvered inlets” of Matthew Arnold’s poetry.<br/><br/> First Muriel Stevens read three sonnets<br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Shakespeare<br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The better Part<br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;& The Good Shepherd with the Kid.<br/> illustrating most convincingly that Matthew Arnold ranks among the great sonnet writers of the English language. Most of his poetry was written in the earlier part of his life, it is serious and moral in spirit and reveals a stoical philosophy. ‘The Scholar-Gypsy’ and ‘Thyrsis’ (the latter written in memory of his friend Arthur Hugh Clough) are probably the best of his longer poems &mdash; their austere but serene melancholy contrasts strangely with his lively and controversial prose. Mr. Pollard pointed out how Matthew Arnold has a way of writing on a very tragic subject and then rounding up the poem with a few lines of serene beauty, and he read from ‘Sohrab and Rustum’ to illustrate this. <br/> Rosamund Wallis read “Stagirius” a very beautiful prayer offered up by a young monk. <br/> Mr. Pollard then told us of Matthew Arnold’s “Theory of Poetry” as expounded in his “Essays in Criticism” &mdash; this was that great poetry has to be a criticism of Life &mdash; a questionable theory since it rules out all the great lyrical poetry which has been written. Arnold’s own poetry is for the most part rather rugged in metre, irregular and unrhymed and for tis reason is said by some to be lacking in music. His Philosophy is illustrated in the ‘Sonnet to a Friend” which Mr. Pollard read, and summed up in the line “He saw life steadily, and saw it whole”. Mr Pollard then read from ‘Tristram & Iseult’ and Mrs. Pollard read ‘The Forsaken Merman’ to illustrate other rather different verses. <br/> Questioned as to whether he agreed with the critics who place Matthew Arnold third to Browning and Tennyson among Victorian Poets Mr Pollard said he thought not &mdash; that they are all on one level but each in a different category. He concluded by reading William Watson’s Poem on Matthew Arnold “In Laleham Churchyard”.<br/><br/> [Signed as a true record] R. D. L. Moore<br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;May 31. 1941"

Source


Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO27
EuRED : text provenance
TPR207

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Stevens, Muriel
Born in ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
May 5 1941
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT111
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF2
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Material by kind permission of the XII Book Club. For further information and permission to quote this source, contact the Reading Experience Database (http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/reading/contacts.php).

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:


http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/96234
Accessed on 2020/01/25 21:29:31

Related place
England
Related people
Stevens, Muriel
Related place
England
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          <ptr target="ukred-31622">"Meeting held at 72 Shinfield Road. 5th May 1941&lt;br/&gt;
&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;A. G Joselin in the chair. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
[...]&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
5. F. E. Pollard then undertook to guide us through “the moon-silvered inlets” of 
Matthew Arnold’s poetry.&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt;
First Muriel Stevens read three sonnets&lt;br/&gt;
&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;Shakespeare&lt;br/&gt;
&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;The better Part&lt;br/&gt;
&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp; The Good Shepherd with the Kid.&lt;br/&gt;
illustrating most convincingly that Matthew Arnold ranks among the great sonnet 
writers of the English language. Most of his poetry was written in the earlier part 
of his life, it is serious and moral in spirit and reveals a stoical philosophy. ‘The 
Scholar-Gypsy’ and ‘Thyrsis’ (the latter written in memory of his friend Arthur 
Hugh Clough) are probably the best of his longer poems &amp;mdash; their austere but serene 
melancholy contrasts strangely with his lively and controversial prose. Mr. Pollard 
pointed out how Matthew Arnold has a way of writing on a very tragic subject and 
then rounding up the poem with a few lines of serene beauty, and he read from 
‘Sohrab and Rustum’ to illustrate this. &lt;br/&gt;
Rosamund Wallis read “Stagirius” a very beautiful prayer offered up by a young 
monk. &lt;br/&gt;
Mr. Pollard then told us of Matthew Arnold’s “Theory of Poetry” as expounded in 
his “Essays in Criticism” &amp;mdash; this was that great poetry has to be a criticism of Life &amp;mdash; 
a questionable theory since it rules out all the great lyrical poetry which has been 
written. Arnold’s own poetry is for the most part rather rugged in metre, irregular 
and unrhymed and for tis reason is said by some to be lacking in music. His 
Philosophy is illustrated in the ‘Sonnet to a Friend” which Mr. Pollard read, and 
summed up in the line “He saw life steadily, and saw it whole”. Mr Pollard then 
read from ‘Tristram &amp; Iseult’ and Mrs. Pollard read ‘The Forsaken Merman’ to 
illustrate other rather different verses. &lt;br/&gt;
Questioned as to whether he agreed with the critics who place Matthew Arnold 
third to Browning and Tennyson among Victorian Poets Mr Pollard said he thought 
not &amp;mdash; that they are all on one level but each in a different category. He concluded 
by reading William Watson’s Poem on Matthew Arnold “In Laleham 
Churchyard”.&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt;
[Signed as a true record] R. D. L. Moore&lt;br/&gt;
&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;May 31. 1941"</ptr>
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?itemComments

The Better Part

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-31622

Evidence

"Meeting held at 72 Shinfield Road. 5th May 1941<br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;A. G Joselin in the chair. <br/> <br/> [...]<br/> <br/> 5. F. E. Pollard then undertook to guide us through “the moon-silvered inlets” of Matthew Arnold’s poetry.<br/><br/> First Muriel Stevens read three sonnets<br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Shakespeare<br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The better Part<br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;& The Good Shepherd with the Kid.<br/> illustrating most convincingly that Matthew Arnold ranks among the great sonnet writers of the English language. Most of his poetry was written in the earlier part of his life, it is serious and moral in spirit and reveals a stoical philosophy. ‘The Scholar-Gypsy’ and ‘Thyrsis’ (the latter written in memory of his friend Arthur Hugh Clough) are probably the best of his longer poems &mdash; their austere but serene melancholy contrasts strangely with his lively and controversial prose. Mr. Pollard pointed out how Matthew Arnold has a way of writing on a very tragic subject and then rounding up the poem with a few lines of serene beauty, and he read from ‘Sohrab and Rustum’ to illustrate this. <br/> Rosamund Wallis read “Stagirius” a very beautiful prayer offered up by a young monk. <br/> Mr. Pollard then told us of Matthew Arnold’s “Theory of Poetry” as expounded in his “Essays in Criticism” &mdash; this was that great poetry has to be a criticism of Life &mdash; a questionable theory since it rules out all the great lyrical poetry which has been written. Arnold’s own poetry is for the most part rather rugged in metre, irregular and unrhymed and for tis reason is said by some to be lacking in music. His Philosophy is illustrated in the ‘Sonnet to a Friend” which Mr. Pollard read, and summed up in the line “He saw life steadily, and saw it whole”. Mr Pollard then read from ‘Tristram & Iseult’ and Mrs. Pollard read ‘The Forsaken Merman’ to illustrate other rather different verses. <br/> Questioned as to whether he agreed with the critics who place Matthew Arnold third to Browning and Tennyson among Victorian Poets Mr Pollard said he thought not &mdash; that they are all on one level but each in a different category. He concluded by reading William Watson’s Poem on Matthew Arnold “In Laleham Churchyard”.<br/><br/> [Signed as a true record] R. D. L. Moore<br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;May 31. 1941"

Source


Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO27
EuRED : text provenance
TPR207

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Stevens, Muriel
Born in ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
May 5 1941
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT111
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF2
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Material by kind permission of the XII Book Club. For further information and permission to quote this source, contact the Reading Experience Database (http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/reading/contacts.php).

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:


http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/96234
Accessed on 2020/01/25 21:29:31

Related place
England
Related people
Stevens, Muriel
Related place
England
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        <p>
          <ptr target="ukred-31622">"Meeting held at 72 Shinfield Road. 5th May 1941&lt;br/&gt;
&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;A. G Joselin in the chair. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
[...]&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
5. F. E. Pollard then undertook to guide us through “the moon-silvered inlets” of 
Matthew Arnold’s poetry.&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt;
First Muriel Stevens read three sonnets&lt;br/&gt;
&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;Shakespeare&lt;br/&gt;
&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;The better Part&lt;br/&gt;
&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp; The Good Shepherd with the Kid.&lt;br/&gt;
illustrating most convincingly that Matthew Arnold ranks among the great sonnet 
writers of the English language. Most of his poetry was written in the earlier part 
of his life, it is serious and moral in spirit and reveals a stoical philosophy. ‘The 
Scholar-Gypsy’ and ‘Thyrsis’ (the latter written in memory of his friend Arthur 
Hugh Clough) are probably the best of his longer poems &amp;mdash; their austere but serene 
melancholy contrasts strangely with his lively and controversial prose. Mr. Pollard 
pointed out how Matthew Arnold has a way of writing on a very tragic subject and 
then rounding up the poem with a few lines of serene beauty, and he read from 
‘Sohrab and Rustum’ to illustrate this. &lt;br/&gt;
Rosamund Wallis read “Stagirius” a very beautiful prayer offered up by a young 
monk. &lt;br/&gt;
Mr. Pollard then told us of Matthew Arnold’s “Theory of Poetry” as expounded in 
his “Essays in Criticism” &amp;mdash; this was that great poetry has to be a criticism of Life &amp;mdash; 
a questionable theory since it rules out all the great lyrical poetry which has been 
written. Arnold’s own poetry is for the most part rather rugged in metre, irregular 
and unrhymed and for tis reason is said by some to be lacking in music. His 
Philosophy is illustrated in the ‘Sonnet to a Friend” which Mr. Pollard read, and 
summed up in the line “He saw life steadily, and saw it whole”. Mr Pollard then 
read from ‘Tristram &amp; Iseult’ and Mrs. Pollard read ‘The Forsaken Merman’ to 
illustrate other rather different verses. &lt;br/&gt;
Questioned as to whether he agreed with the critics who place Matthew Arnold 
third to Browning and Tennyson among Victorian Poets Mr Pollard said he thought 
not &amp;mdash; that they are all on one level but each in a different category. He concluded 
by reading William Watson’s Poem on Matthew Arnold “In Laleham 
Churchyard”.&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt;
[Signed as a true record] R. D. L. Moore&lt;br/&gt;
&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;May 31. 1941"</ptr>
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