The American Commonwealth

Reading experience

?itemComments

The American Commonwealth

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-31333

Evidence

‘Those who have read Professor Bryce’s “American Commonwealth” will remember his panegyric upon the powerful influence and great value of the Universities in that country. I may be permitted to quote the following passage :- “It is the glory of the American Universities, as of those of Scotland and Germany, to be freely accessible to all classes of the people ... One praise which has been given to the Universities of Scotland may be given to those of America – while the German Universities have been popular but not free; while the English Universities have been free but not popular: the American Universities have been both free and popular ...They are supplying equally those things which American citizens have hitherto found lacking to America; and they are contributing to the political as well as to her contemplative life elements of inestimable worth ... And I will add another passage which he wrote when, after an interval of fifteen years, he resumed his theme in even more highly eulogistic terms – “In every civilised country the march of scientific discovery has led to an enormous increase in the applications of science to productive industry. This has been followed by a demand for men conversant with those teachings, and to supply that demand the teaching of applied science has been provided on a scale undreamed of even a generation ago. Nowhere, perhaps not even in Germany, has this movement gone so fast or as far as in the United States. While the existing Universities have been enlarged by the addition of scientific departments, a host of independent or affiliated Scientific Schools and Technical Institutions have sprung up ... The recent development of the higher education is, however, most conspicuous in the enormous increase in the attendance of students ... The Universities and Colleges have, taken as a whole, rendered an immense service. They have brought instruction within the reach of every boy and girl of every class. They receive a larger ppropportion of the youthful population than do any similar institutions in any other country. They are resorted to hardly less by those who mean to tread the paths of commerce or industry than by those who prepare themselves for a learned profession ... They have turned a University course from being a luxury, which it has been in the Old World, into being almost a necessary of life. And they have expanded their educational

Source

Addresses on Matters Educational Delivered by the Hon. H.F. Hardacre, Minister for Public Instruction, During His Term Of Office, June, 1915 --- September, 1919

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Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Hardacre, Herbert Freemont
Aged 57 [Experience in 1918, born in 1861]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
November 11 1918
Time of Reading Experience
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Notes
[For AusRED]

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Addresses on Matters Educational Delivered by the Hon. H.F. Hardacre, Minister for Public Instruction, During His Term Of Office, June, 1915 --- September, 1919
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/95717
Accessed on 2020/05/31 22:52:06

Related place
Australia
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The American Commonwealth

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-31333

Evidence

‘Those who have read Professor Bryce’s “American Commonwealth” will remember his panegyric upon the powerful influence and great value of the Universities in that country. I may be permitted to quote the following passage :- “It is the glory of the American Universities, as of those of Scotland and Germany, to be freely accessible to all classes of the people ... One praise which has been given to the Universities of Scotland may be given to those of America – while the German Universities have been popular but not free; while the English Universities have been free but not popular: the American Universities have been both free and popular ...They are supplying equally those things which American citizens have hitherto found lacking to America; and they are contributing to the political as well as to her contemplative life elements of inestimable worth ... And I will add another passage which he wrote when, after an interval of fifteen years, he resumed his theme in even more highly eulogistic terms – “In every civilised country the march of scientific discovery has led to an enormous increase in the applications of science to productive industry. This has been followed by a demand for men conversant with those teachings, and to supply that demand the teaching of applied science has been provided on a scale undreamed of even a generation ago. Nowhere, perhaps not even in Germany, has this movement gone so fast or as far as in the United States. While the existing Universities have been enlarged by the addition of scientific departments, a host of independent or affiliated Scientific Schools and Technical Institutions have sprung up ... The recent development of the higher education is, however, most conspicuous in the enormous increase in the attendance of students ... The Universities and Colleges have, taken as a whole, rendered an immense service. They have brought instruction within the reach of every boy and girl of every class. They receive a larger ppropportion of the youthful population than do any similar institutions in any other country. They are resorted to hardly less by those who mean to tread the paths of commerce or industry than by those who prepare themselves for a learned profession ... They have turned a University course from being a luxury, which it has been in the Old World, into being almost a necessary of life. And they have expanded their educational

Source

Addresses on Matters Educational Delivered by the Hon. H.F. Hardacre, Minister for Public Instruction, During His Term Of Office, June, 1915 --- September, 1919

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Reader(s) and listener(s)

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Hardacre, Herbert Freemont
Aged 57 [Experience in 1918, born in 1861]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
November 11 1918
Time of Reading Experience
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EXF2
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Australia
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
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EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
[For AusRED]

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Addresses on Matters Educational Delivered by the Hon. H.F. Hardacre, Minister for Public Instruction, During His Term Of Office, June, 1915 --- September, 1919
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/95717
Accessed on 2020/05/31 22:52:06

Related place
Australia
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            <ptr target="ukred-31333">‘Those who have read Professor Bryce’s “American Commonwealth” will remember his panegyric upon the powerful influence and great value of the Universities in that country. I may be permitted to quote the following passage :-
	“It is the glory of the American Universities, as of those of Scotland and Germany, to be freely accessible to all classes of the people ... One praise which has been given to the Universities of Scotland may be given to those of America – while the German Universities have been popular but not free; while the English Universities have been free but not popular: the American Universities have been both free and popular ...They are supplying equally those things which American citizens have hitherto found lacking to America; and they are contributing to the political as well as to her contemplative life elements of inestimable worth ...
	And I will add another passage which he wrote when, after an interval of fifteen years, he resumed his theme in even more highly eulogistic terms –
	“In every civilised country the march of scientific discovery has led to an enormous increase in the applications of science to productive industry. This has been followed by a demand for men conversant with those teachings, and to supply that demand the teaching of applied science has been provided on a scale undreamed of even a generation ago. Nowhere, perhaps not even in Germany, has this movement gone so fast or as far as in the United States. While the existing Universities have been enlarged by the addition of scientific departments, a host of independent or affiliated Scientific Schools and Technical Institutions have sprung up ... The recent development of the higher education is, however, most conspicuous in the enormous increase in the attendance of students ... The Universities and Colleges have, taken as a whole, rendered an immense service. They have brought instruction within the reach of every boy and girl of every class. They receive a larger ppropportion of the youthful population than do any similar institutions in any other country. They are resorted to hardly less by those who mean to tread the paths of commerce or industry than by those who prepare themselves for a learned profession ... They have turned a University course from being a luxury, which it has been in the Old World, into being almost a necessary of life. And they have expanded their educational</ptr>
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