[on Ruskin’s theories on art & artists]

Reading experience

?itemComments

[on Ruskin’s theories on art & artists]

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-30576

Evidence

"Meeting held at Gower Cottage, 28th May 1945 <br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Elsie D. Harrod in the chair. <br/> <br/> [...] <br/> <br/> 4. The subject of the evening was John Ruskin, and Faith Miller gave us a most comprehensive and absorbingly interesting account of his life, his writings and his ideals. So complete was this survey, of a man who wrote so much & lived such a long and full life, that your secretary finds it difficult, in writing this minute, to maintain her reputation for being brief and to the point! But suffice it to say that Faith Miller’s discourse drew forth one of those spontaneous burst of applause only accorded on rare occasions for contributions of outstanding worth. <br/> <br/> 5. Cyril Langford then read a passage from “On the Nature of Gothic” setting forth Ruskin’s principle that the working creature is either a man or a tool – he cannot be both. He followed this with part of a modern commentary on Ruskin by R. H Wilenski which stated quite simply that Ruskin could not write because his mind had been drugged from birth onward by the emotive language of the Bible. This heterodox statement aroused strong opposition but it also had some support and a lively argument ensued, and indeed it seemed that Diplomatic relations between members were in danger of being broken off, when came in a timely invitation to supper from our hostess and we were united once more in our appreciation of the excellent refreshments provided. <br/> <br/> 6. Muriel Stevens then revealed to us Ruskin’s theories on Art & Artists & we hope she did not feel discouraged by the fact that members were apparently far more interested in the reproductions she passed round than in what Ruskin had to say about them. She also read from Picasso on “Cubism”, but this was a realm into which few, if any of us, could follow her. <br/> <br/> 7. Bruce Dilks then spoke of Ruskin’s ideas on political economy & social reform. We heard how he advocated a system of national education and attacked a state whose system of economics was based solely on the acquisition of wealth. <br/> <br/> 8. Finally Francis Pollard read a passage from “Sesame and Lilies”, skilfully selected to prove once & for all that Ruskin <u>could</u> write & that in a clear, forceful manner readily understood by anyone of even average intellect."

Source


Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO27
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Stevens, Muriel
Born in ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
May 28 1945
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT111
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF2
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Material by kind permission of the XII Book Club. For further information and permission to quote this source, contact the Reading Experience Database (http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/reading/contacts.php).

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:


http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/94280
Accessed on 2020/01/25 10:11:28

Related place
England
Related people
Stevens, Muriel
Related place
England
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          <ptr target="ukred-30576">"Meeting held at Gower Cottage, 28th May 1945 &lt;br/&gt;
&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;Elsie D. Harrod in the chair. &lt;br/&gt;
 &lt;br/&gt;
[...] &lt;br/&gt;
 &lt;br/&gt;
4. The subject of the evening was John Ruskin, and Faith Miller gave us a most 
comprehensive and absorbingly interesting account of his life, his writings and his 
ideals. So complete was this survey, of a man who wrote so much &amp; lived such a 
long and full life, that your secretary finds it difficult, in writing this minute, to 
maintain her reputation for being brief and to the point! But suffice it to say that 
Faith Miller’s discourse drew forth one of those spontaneous burst of applause only 
accorded on rare occasions for contributions of outstanding worth. &lt;br/&gt;
 &lt;br/&gt;
5. Cyril Langford then read a passage from “On the Nature of Gothic” setting forth 
Ruskin’s principle that the working creature is either a man or a tool – he cannot 
be both. He followed this with part of a modern commentary on Ruskin by R. H 
Wilenski which stated quite simply that Ruskin could not write because his mind 
had been drugged from birth onward by the emotive language of the Bible. This 
heterodox statement aroused strong opposition but it also had some support and a 
lively argument ensued, and indeed it seemed that Diplomatic relations between 
members were in danger of being broken off, when came in a timely invitation to 
supper from our hostess and we were united once more in our appreciation of the 
excellent refreshments provided. &lt;br/&gt;
 &lt;br/&gt;
6. Muriel Stevens then revealed to us Ruskin’s theories on Art &amp; Artists &amp; we hope 
she did not feel discouraged by the fact that members were apparently far more 
interested in the reproductions she passed round than in what Ruskin had to say 
about them. She also read from Picasso on “Cubism”, but this was a realm into 
which few, if any of us, could follow her. &lt;br/&gt;
 &lt;br/&gt;
7. Bruce Dilks then spoke of Ruskin’s ideas on political economy &amp; social reform. 
We heard how he advocated a system of national education and attacked a state 
whose system of economics was based solely on the acquisition of wealth. &lt;br/&gt;
 &lt;br/&gt;
8. Finally Francis Pollard read a passage from “Sesame and Lilies”, skilfully 
selected to prove once &amp; for all that Ruskin &lt;u&gt;could&lt;/u&gt; write &amp; that in a clear, 
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[on Ruskin’s theories on art & artists]

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-30576

Evidence

"Meeting held at Gower Cottage, 28th May 1945 <br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Elsie D. Harrod in the chair. <br/> <br/> [...] <br/> <br/> 4. The subject of the evening was John Ruskin, and Faith Miller gave us a most comprehensive and absorbingly interesting account of his life, his writings and his ideals. So complete was this survey, of a man who wrote so much & lived such a long and full life, that your secretary finds it difficult, in writing this minute, to maintain her reputation for being brief and to the point! But suffice it to say that Faith Miller’s discourse drew forth one of those spontaneous burst of applause only accorded on rare occasions for contributions of outstanding worth. <br/> <br/> 5. Cyril Langford then read a passage from “On the Nature of Gothic” setting forth Ruskin’s principle that the working creature is either a man or a tool – he cannot be both. He followed this with part of a modern commentary on Ruskin by R. H Wilenski which stated quite simply that Ruskin could not write because his mind had been drugged from birth onward by the emotive language of the Bible. This heterodox statement aroused strong opposition but it also had some support and a lively argument ensued, and indeed it seemed that Diplomatic relations between members were in danger of being broken off, when came in a timely invitation to supper from our hostess and we were united once more in our appreciation of the excellent refreshments provided. <br/> <br/> 6. Muriel Stevens then revealed to us Ruskin’s theories on Art & Artists & we hope she did not feel discouraged by the fact that members were apparently far more interested in the reproductions she passed round than in what Ruskin had to say about them. She also read from Picasso on “Cubism”, but this was a realm into which few, if any of us, could follow her. <br/> <br/> 7. Bruce Dilks then spoke of Ruskin’s ideas on political economy & social reform. We heard how he advocated a system of national education and attacked a state whose system of economics was based solely on the acquisition of wealth. <br/> <br/> 8. Finally Francis Pollard read a passage from “Sesame and Lilies”, skilfully selected to prove once & for all that Ruskin <u>could</u> write & that in a clear, forceful manner readily understood by anyone of even average intellect."

Source


Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO27
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Stevens, Muriel
Born in ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
May 28 1945
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT111
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF2
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Material by kind permission of the XII Book Club. For further information and permission to quote this source, contact the Reading Experience Database (http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/reading/contacts.php).

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:


http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/94280
Accessed on 2020/01/25 10:11:28

Related place
England
Related people
Stevens, Muriel
Related place
England
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        <p>
          <ptr target="ukred-30576">"Meeting held at Gower Cottage, 28th May 1945 &lt;br/&gt;
&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;Elsie D. Harrod in the chair. &lt;br/&gt;
 &lt;br/&gt;
[...] &lt;br/&gt;
 &lt;br/&gt;
4. The subject of the evening was John Ruskin, and Faith Miller gave us a most 
comprehensive and absorbingly interesting account of his life, his writings and his 
ideals. So complete was this survey, of a man who wrote so much &amp; lived such a 
long and full life, that your secretary finds it difficult, in writing this minute, to 
maintain her reputation for being brief and to the point! But suffice it to say that 
Faith Miller’s discourse drew forth one of those spontaneous burst of applause only 
accorded on rare occasions for contributions of outstanding worth. &lt;br/&gt;
 &lt;br/&gt;
5. Cyril Langford then read a passage from “On the Nature of Gothic” setting forth 
Ruskin’s principle that the working creature is either a man or a tool – he cannot 
be both. He followed this with part of a modern commentary on Ruskin by R. H 
Wilenski which stated quite simply that Ruskin could not write because his mind 
had been drugged from birth onward by the emotive language of the Bible. This 
heterodox statement aroused strong opposition but it also had some support and a 
lively argument ensued, and indeed it seemed that Diplomatic relations between 
members were in danger of being broken off, when came in a timely invitation to 
supper from our hostess and we were united once more in our appreciation of the 
excellent refreshments provided. &lt;br/&gt;
 &lt;br/&gt;
6. Muriel Stevens then revealed to us Ruskin’s theories on Art &amp; Artists &amp; we hope 
she did not feel discouraged by the fact that members were apparently far more 
interested in the reproductions she passed round than in what Ruskin had to say 
about them. She also read from Picasso on “Cubism”, but this was a realm into 
which few, if any of us, could follow her. &lt;br/&gt;
 &lt;br/&gt;
7. Bruce Dilks then spoke of Ruskin’s ideas on political economy &amp; social reform. 
We heard how he advocated a system of national education and attacked a state 
whose system of economics was based solely on the acquisition of wealth. &lt;br/&gt;
 &lt;br/&gt;
8. Finally Francis Pollard read a passage from “Sesame and Lilies”, skilfully 
selected to prove once &amp; for all that Ruskin &lt;u&gt;could&lt;/u&gt; write &amp; that in a clear, 
forceful manner readily understood by anyone of even average intellect."</ptr>
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