Wuthering Heights

Reading experience

?itemComments

Wuthering Heights

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-30564

Evidence

"Meeting held at 22 Cintra Avenue, Northcourt Avenue, 25th April 1945<br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;F. E. Pollard in the chair. <br/> <br/> [...] <br/> <br/> 2. The minutes of the last meeting were read & signed. <br/> <br/> 5. Alice Joselin introduced the subject of the evening with a biographical study of the Brontë family. Contrary to her expressed idea that she could do little more than recite a list of dates, Alice Joselin drew for us a vivid picture of the life at Haworth Rectory and the way in which the three sisters took the literary world by storm. <br/> <br/> 6. After adjourning for refreshment we turned our attentions to a study of the works of Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë. First Margaret Dilks read from “Vil[l]ette” the description of Mme. Rachel, the famous actress. Since this passage is the only contribution Charlotte Brontë is allowed to make to the Oxford Book of English Prose, it is presumably considered great by someone who should be qualified to judge. But when the reader had finished, the only audible comment from this learned gathering was “Can someone tell me what all that means?” <br/> <br/> 7. F. E. Pollard then gave us the benefit of his discerning criticism of the works of these writers. Describing himself as of a naturally romantic & sentimental turn of mind (cheers and prolonged applause) he championed Jane Eyre and Shirley. There followed a lively discussion in which nearly all members took part. The excessive wordiness of which both Emily & Charlotte are sometimes guilty, was attributed to the bad influence of the continent on the Englishman’s [sic!] natural restraint. Several members of the fair sex expressed a distaste for the horrors of Wuthering Heights, one even going so far as to suggest that the author was probably mad. Cyril Langford, reading from a newspaper article, put forward an interesting theory that the book was the natural psychological reaction of one whose life was mainly occupied in household duties; and Thomas Hopkins crowned all by telling us that he had once been presented with Wuthering Heights as a Sunday School prize. Cyril Langford also drew our attention to Jane Eyre’s description of her own paintings, which were clearly the forerunners of surrealism. Other readings given were:-<br/> Howard Smith from Wuthering Heights[,]<br/> Rosamund Wallis from Shirley[,]<br/> & Howard Smith from The Gondal Poems[.]"

Source


Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Smith, Howard
Aged 85 [Experience in 1945, born in 1860]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
April 25 1945
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT111
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF2
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Material by kind permission of the XII Book Club. For further information and permission to quote this source, contact the Reading Experience Database (http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/reading/contacts.php).

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:


http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/94260
Accessed on 2020/01/19 20:37:30

Related place
England
Related people
Smith, Howard
Related place
England
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE TEI PUBLIC "customisation-tei/tei_readingExp.dtd" "">
<TEI xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0">
  <teiHeader>
    <fileDesc>
      <titleStmt>
        <author>
          <persName>
            <forename>Emily</forename>
            <surname>Brontë</surname>
          </persName>
        </author>
        <title>Wuthering Heights</title>
      </titleStmt>
      <sourceDesc>
        <msDesc>
          <msIdentifier>
            <country/>
            <settlement/>
            <institution/>
            <repository>private collection</repository>
            <collection/>
            <idno/>
          </msIdentifier>
          <msContents>
            <msItem>
              <title>XII Book Club Minute Book, Vol. 5 (1944-1952)</title>
              <author>Margaret Dilks</author>
            </msItem>
          </msContents>
        </msDesc>
      </sourceDesc>
      <notesStmt>
        <note>xml/ukred-30564.xml</note>
      </notesStmt>
    </fileDesc>
    <profileDesc>
      <correspDesc>
        <correspAction type="sending">
          <persName>
            <forename/>
            <surname/>
          </persName>
        </correspAction>
        <correspAction type="receiving">
          <persName>
            <forename/>
            <surname/>
          </persName>
        </correspAction>
      </correspDesc>
      <langUsage/>
    </profileDesc>
    <experienceDesc>
      <experience ref="ukred-30564">
        <respStmt resp="submitter">
          <resp>submitted by</resp>
          <persName>
            <forename>Ian</forename>
            <surname>Spackman</surname>
          </persName>
          <address>
            <address_line/>
          </address>
          <email>ian.spackman@talktalk.net</email>
        </respStmt>
        <respStmt resp="editor"/>
        <date when="1945-04-25">Apr. 25 1945</date>
        <time>in the evening</time>
        <reader>
          <persName>
            <forename>Howard</forename>
            <surname>Smith</surname>
          </persName>
          <sex>M</sex>
          <age>Adult (18-100+)</age>
          <education scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/education"/>
          <birth>1880-07-15</birth>
          <faith scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/faith" ref="FAI233">Quakers</faith>
          <readerStatus scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/reader_status"/>
        </reader>
        <listener>
          <note>Members of the XII Book Club</note>
        </listener>
        <place>
          <placeName type="street">22, Cintra Avenue</placeName>
          <location>
            <country>England</country>
            <county>Berkshire</county>
            <settlement type="city">Reading</settlement>
            <district/>
          </location>
        </place>
        <textRead>
          <author>
            <persName>
              <forename>Emily</forename>
              <surname>Brontë</surname>
            </persName>
          </author>
          <title>Wuthering Heights</title>
          <genre scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/genre" ref="GEN3">Fiction</genre>
          <textProvenance ref="TPR215" scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_provenance">Unknown</textProvenance>
          <textStatus ref="TST4" scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_status">Unknown</textStatus>
          <textForm scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_form" ref="TFO02">Book</textForm>
          <origLanguage>
            <language/>
          </origLanguage>
          <textStatus scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_status"/>
        </textRead>
        <readingExp>
          <experienceType scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/experience_type" ref="EXT111">Aloud</experienceType>
          <posture scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/posture"/>
          <lighting scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/lighting"/>
          <environment scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/environment"/>
          <intensity scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/intensity"/>
          <emotion scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/emotion"/>
          <testimony scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/testimony"/>
          <sourceReliability scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/source_reliability"/>
          <expFrequency scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/experience_frequency" ref="EXF2">Single event</expFrequency>
          <note>Material by kind permission of the XII Book Club. For further information and permission to quote this source, contact the Reading Experience Database (http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/reading/contacts.php).</note>
        </readingExp>
      </experience>
    </experienceDesc>
  </teiHeader>
  <text>
    <body>
      <div type="chapter" label="Margaret Dilks was secretary to the XII Book Club from 1940 to 1970. It is inferred from this, and from the handwriting, that she was the author of this set of minutes.&#10;">
        <p>
          <ptr target="ukred-30564">"Meeting held at 22 Cintra Avenue, Northcourt Avenue, 25th April 1945&lt;br/&gt;
&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;F. E. Pollard in the chair. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
[...] &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
2. The minutes of the last meeting were read &amp; signed. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
5. Alice Joselin introduced the subject of the evening with a biographical study of 
the Brontë family. Contrary to her expressed idea that she could do little more 
than recite a list of dates, Alice Joselin drew for us a vivid picture of the life at 
Haworth Rectory and the way in which the three sisters took the literary world by 
storm. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
6. After adjourning for refreshment we turned our attentions to a study of the 
works of Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë. First Margaret Dilks read from 
“Vil[l]ette” the description of Mme. Rachel, the famous actress. Since this passage 
is the only contribution Charlotte Brontë is allowed to make to the Oxford Book of 
English Prose, it is presumably considered great by someone who should be 
qualified to judge. But when the reader had finished, the only audible comment 
from this learned gathering was “Can someone tell me what all that means?” 
&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
7. F. E. Pollard then gave us the benefit of his discerning criticism of the works of 
these writers. Describing himself as of a naturally romantic &amp; sentimental turn of 
mind (cheers and prolonged applause) he championed Jane Eyre and Shirley. 
There followed a lively discussion in which nearly all members took part. The 
excessive wordiness of which both Emily &amp; Charlotte are sometimes guilty, was 
attributed to the bad influence of the continent on the Englishman’s [sic!] natural 
restraint. Several members of the fair sex expressed a distaste for the horrors of 
Wuthering Heights, one even going so far as to suggest that the author was 
probably mad. Cyril Langford, reading from a newspaper article, put forward an 
interesting theory that the book was the natural psychological reaction of one 
whose life was mainly occupied in household duties; and Thomas Hopkins crowned 
all by telling us that he had once been presented with Wuthering Heights as a 
Sunday School prize. Cyril Langford also drew our attention to Jane Eyre’s 
description of her own paintings, which were clearly the forerunners of surrealism. 
Other readings given were:-&lt;br/&gt;
 Howard Smith from Wuthering Heights[,]&lt;br/&gt;
 Rosamund Wallis from Shirley[,]&lt;br/&gt;
 &amp; Howard Smith from The Gondal Poems[.]"</ptr>
        </p>
      </div>
    </body>
  </text>
</TEI>
?itemComments

Wuthering Heights

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-30564

Evidence

"Meeting held at 22 Cintra Avenue, Northcourt Avenue, 25th April 1945<br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;F. E. Pollard in the chair. <br/> <br/> [...] <br/> <br/> 2. The minutes of the last meeting were read & signed. <br/> <br/> 5. Alice Joselin introduced the subject of the evening with a biographical study of the Brontë family. Contrary to her expressed idea that she could do little more than recite a list of dates, Alice Joselin drew for us a vivid picture of the life at Haworth Rectory and the way in which the three sisters took the literary world by storm. <br/> <br/> 6. After adjourning for refreshment we turned our attentions to a study of the works of Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë. First Margaret Dilks read from “Vil[l]ette” the description of Mme. Rachel, the famous actress. Since this passage is the only contribution Charlotte Brontë is allowed to make to the Oxford Book of English Prose, it is presumably considered great by someone who should be qualified to judge. But when the reader had finished, the only audible comment from this learned gathering was “Can someone tell me what all that means?” <br/> <br/> 7. F. E. Pollard then gave us the benefit of his discerning criticism of the works of these writers. Describing himself as of a naturally romantic & sentimental turn of mind (cheers and prolonged applause) he championed Jane Eyre and Shirley. There followed a lively discussion in which nearly all members took part. The excessive wordiness of which both Emily & Charlotte are sometimes guilty, was attributed to the bad influence of the continent on the Englishman’s [sic!] natural restraint. Several members of the fair sex expressed a distaste for the horrors of Wuthering Heights, one even going so far as to suggest that the author was probably mad. Cyril Langford, reading from a newspaper article, put forward an interesting theory that the book was the natural psychological reaction of one whose life was mainly occupied in household duties; and Thomas Hopkins crowned all by telling us that he had once been presented with Wuthering Heights as a Sunday School prize. Cyril Langford also drew our attention to Jane Eyre’s description of her own paintings, which were clearly the forerunners of surrealism. Other readings given were:-<br/> Howard Smith from Wuthering Heights[,]<br/> Rosamund Wallis from Shirley[,]<br/> & Howard Smith from The Gondal Poems[.]"

Source


Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Smith, Howard
Aged 85 [Experience in 1945, born in 1860]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
April 25 1945
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT111
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF2
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Material by kind permission of the XII Book Club. For further information and permission to quote this source, contact the Reading Experience Database (http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/reading/contacts.php).

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:


http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/94260
Accessed on 2020/01/19 20:37:30

Related place
England
Related people
Smith, Howard
Related place
England
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE TEI PUBLIC "customisation-tei/tei_readingExp.dtd" "">
<TEI xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0">
  <teiHeader>
    <fileDesc>
      <titleStmt>
        <author>
          <persName>
            <forename>Emily</forename>
            <surname>Brontë</surname>
          </persName>
        </author>
        <title>Wuthering Heights</title>
      </titleStmt>
      <sourceDesc>
        <msDesc>
          <msIdentifier>
            <country/>
            <settlement/>
            <institution/>
            <repository>private collection</repository>
            <collection/>
            <idno/>
          </msIdentifier>
          <msContents>
            <msItem>
              <title>XII Book Club Minute Book, Vol. 5 (1944-1952)</title>
              <author>Margaret Dilks</author>
            </msItem>
          </msContents>
        </msDesc>
      </sourceDesc>
      <notesStmt>
        <note>xml/ukred-30564.xml</note>
      </notesStmt>
    </fileDesc>
    <profileDesc>
      <correspDesc>
        <correspAction type="sending">
          <persName>
            <forename/>
            <surname/>
          </persName>
        </correspAction>
        <correspAction type="receiving">
          <persName>
            <forename/>
            <surname/>
          </persName>
        </correspAction>
      </correspDesc>
      <langUsage/>
    </profileDesc>
    <experienceDesc>
      <experience ref="ukred-30564">
        <respStmt resp="submitter">
          <resp>submitted by</resp>
          <persName>
            <forename>Ian</forename>
            <surname>Spackman</surname>
          </persName>
          <address>
            <address_line/>
          </address>
          <email>ian.spackman@talktalk.net</email>
        </respStmt>
        <respStmt resp="editor"/>
        <date when="1945-04-25">Apr. 25 1945</date>
        <time>in the evening</time>
        <reader>
          <persName>
            <forename>Howard</forename>
            <surname>Smith</surname>
          </persName>
          <sex>M</sex>
          <age>Adult (18-100+)</age>
          <education scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/education"/>
          <birth>1880-07-15</birth>
          <faith scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/faith" ref="FAI233">Quakers</faith>
          <readerStatus scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/reader_status"/>
        </reader>
        <listener>
          <note>Members of the XII Book Club</note>
        </listener>
        <place>
          <placeName type="street">22, Cintra Avenue</placeName>
          <location>
            <country>England</country>
            <county>Berkshire</county>
            <settlement type="city">Reading</settlement>
            <district/>
          </location>
        </place>
        <textRead>
          <author>
            <persName>
              <forename>Emily</forename>
              <surname>Brontë</surname>
            </persName>
          </author>
          <title>Wuthering Heights</title>
          <genre scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/genre" ref="GEN3">Fiction</genre>
          <textProvenance ref="TPR215" scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_provenance">Unknown</textProvenance>
          <textStatus ref="TST4" scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_status">Unknown</textStatus>
          <textForm scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_form" ref="TFO02">Book</textForm>
          <origLanguage>
            <language/>
          </origLanguage>
          <textStatus scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_status"/>
        </textRead>
        <readingExp>
          <experienceType scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/experience_type" ref="EXT111">Aloud</experienceType>
          <posture scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/posture"/>
          <lighting scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/lighting"/>
          <environment scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/environment"/>
          <intensity scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/intensity"/>
          <emotion scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/emotion"/>
          <testimony scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/testimony"/>
          <sourceReliability scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/source_reliability"/>
          <expFrequency scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/experience_frequency" ref="EXF2">Single event</expFrequency>
          <note>Material by kind permission of the XII Book Club. For further information and permission to quote this source, contact the Reading Experience Database (http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/reading/contacts.php).</note>
        </readingExp>
      </experience>
    </experienceDesc>
  </teiHeader>
  <text>
    <body>
      <div type="chapter" label="Margaret Dilks was secretary to the XII Book Club from 1940 to 1970. It is inferred from this, and from the handwriting, that she was the author of this set of minutes.&#10;">
        <p>
          <ptr target="ukred-30564">"Meeting held at 22 Cintra Avenue, Northcourt Avenue, 25th April 1945&lt;br/&gt;
&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;F. E. Pollard in the chair. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
[...] &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
2. The minutes of the last meeting were read &amp; signed. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
5. Alice Joselin introduced the subject of the evening with a biographical study of 
the Brontë family. Contrary to her expressed idea that she could do little more 
than recite a list of dates, Alice Joselin drew for us a vivid picture of the life at 
Haworth Rectory and the way in which the three sisters took the literary world by 
storm. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
6. After adjourning for refreshment we turned our attentions to a study of the 
works of Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë. First Margaret Dilks read from 
“Vil[l]ette” the description of Mme. Rachel, the famous actress. Since this passage 
is the only contribution Charlotte Brontë is allowed to make to the Oxford Book of 
English Prose, it is presumably considered great by someone who should be 
qualified to judge. But when the reader had finished, the only audible comment 
from this learned gathering was “Can someone tell me what all that means?” 
&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
7. F. E. Pollard then gave us the benefit of his discerning criticism of the works of 
these writers. Describing himself as of a naturally romantic &amp; sentimental turn of 
mind (cheers and prolonged applause) he championed Jane Eyre and Shirley. 
There followed a lively discussion in which nearly all members took part. The 
excessive wordiness of which both Emily &amp; Charlotte are sometimes guilty, was 
attributed to the bad influence of the continent on the Englishman’s [sic!] natural 
restraint. Several members of the fair sex expressed a distaste for the horrors of 
Wuthering Heights, one even going so far as to suggest that the author was 
probably mad. Cyril Langford, reading from a newspaper article, put forward an 
interesting theory that the book was the natural psychological reaction of one 
whose life was mainly occupied in household duties; and Thomas Hopkins crowned 
all by telling us that he had once been presented with Wuthering Heights as a 
Sunday School prize. Cyril Langford also drew our attention to Jane Eyre’s 
description of her own paintings, which were clearly the forerunners of surrealism. 
Other readings given were:-&lt;br/&gt;
 Howard Smith from Wuthering Heights[,]&lt;br/&gt;
 Rosamund Wallis from Shirley[,]&lt;br/&gt;
 &amp; Howard Smith from The Gondal Poems[.]"</ptr>
        </p>
      </div>
    </body>
  </text>
</TEI>