Minutes of the meeting of the XII Book Club held 8 July 1944

Reading experience

?itemComments

Minutes of the meeting of the XII Book Club held 8 July 1944

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-30503

Evidence

"Meeting held at 39, Eastern Avenue 18th Sept, 1944<br/>     A. Bruce Dilks in the chair. <br/> <br/> [...] <br/> <br/> 2. The minutes of the last meeting were read and signed. <br/> <br/> [...] <br/> <br/> 5. Alice Joselin introduced the subject of the evening by telling us something of the life of William Blake. Born in 1757 he was living through the beginning of the industrial revolution. He had no schooling but showed early artistic ability and was apprenticed for 7 years to an engraver. During this time he wrote some of his early poetry. Becoming himself a professional engraver he experimented with a new method of printing “<u>shown to him in a vision</u>”. As she traced the pattern of his life during the remaining 27 years, Alice Joselin gave us a portrait of an embittered man, never well loved even by his friends and incomprehensible to his contemporaries. She concluded with an extract from a Short Survey of William Blake by Quiller Couch. <br/> <br/> 6. F. E. Pollard said that he had been reluctant to undertake the task of talking to the Club on the literature of Wm. Blake since he was acquainted with only three of his poems. But as this was 50% more than anyone else knew, he need not have worried. He emphasised Blakes great lyrical gifts and his share in the poetic revolution of the C18th, even suggesting that Blake led the way. Frances Pollard illustrated his remarks by reading from: [“]To the evening star”, “How sweet I roam” and “Memory hither come”. He also read a short extract from Jerusalem throwing out the suggestion that the subject matter showed some influence of Thomas Payne, Quaker. <br/> <br/> 7. After some refreshment we welcomed to our meeting Mr. George Goyder who is a very keen student and collector of William Blake. It was a great privilege to have among us one whose profound knowledge of and enthusiasm for his subject was absolutely convincing. After listening to Mr. Goyder and looking at his many beautiful examples of Blake’s work, we were willing to allow that he is probably our greatest English artist and equalled as an engraver only by Dürer. <br/> <br/> The Chairman expressed our very warmest thanks to Mr. Goyder. <br/> <br/> [signed as a true record by] J. Knox Taylor 16/X/44."

Source


Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
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TPR211 Reading

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Dilks, Margaret
Born in 2016

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
September 18 1944
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT111
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF2
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
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EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
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Notes
It is assumed that it was Margaret Dilks, as secretary of the club, who read out the minutes of the previous meeting.<br/> Material by kind permission of the XII Book Club. For further information and permission to quote this source, contact the Reading Experience Database (http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/reading/contacts.php).

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:


http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/94150
Accessed on 2020/01/20 04:33:42

Related place
England
Related people
Dilks, Margaret
Related place
England
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          <ptr target="ukred-30503">"Meeting held at 39, Eastern Avenue 18th Sept, 1944&lt;br/&gt;
    A. Bruce Dilks in the chair. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
[...] &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
2. The minutes of the last meeting were read and signed. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
[...] &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
5. Alice Joselin introduced the subject of the evening by telling us something of the life of William Blake. Born in 1757 he was living through the 
beginning of the industrial revolution. He had no schooling but showed early artistic ability and was apprenticed for 7 years to an engraver. During 
this time he wrote some of his early poetry. Becoming himself a professional engraver he experimented with a new method of printing “&lt;u&gt;shown 
to him in a vision&lt;/u&gt;”. As she traced the pattern of his life during the remaining 27 years, Alice Joselin gave us a portrait of an embittered man, 
never well loved even by his friends and incomprehensible to his contemporaries. She concluded with an extract from a Short Survey of William 
Blake by Quiller Couch. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
6. F. E. Pollard said that he had been reluctant to undertake the task of talking to the Club on the literature of Wm. Blake since he was acquainted 
with only three of his poems. But as this was 50% more than anyone else knew, he need not have worried. He emphasised Blakes great lyrical 
gifts and his share in the poetic revolution of the C18th, even suggesting that Blake led the way. Frances Pollard illustrated his remarks by reading 
from: [“]To the evening star”, “How sweet I roam” and “Memory hither come”. He also read a short extract from Jerusalem throwing out the 
suggestion that the subject matter showed some influence of Thomas Payne, Quaker. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
7. After some refreshment we welcomed to our meeting Mr. George Goyder who is a very keen student and collector of William Blake. It was a 
great privilege to have among us one whose profound knowledge of and enthusiasm for his subject was absolutely convincing. After listening to Mr. 
Goyder and looking at his many beautiful examples of Blake’s work, we were willing to allow that he is probably our greatest English artist and 
equalled as an engraver only by Dürer. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
The Chairman expressed our very warmest thanks to Mr. Goyder. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
[signed as a true record by] J. Knox Taylor 16/X/44."</ptr>
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?itemComments

Minutes of the meeting of the XII Book Club held 8 July 1944

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-30503

Evidence

"Meeting held at 39, Eastern Avenue 18th Sept, 1944<br/>     A. Bruce Dilks in the chair. <br/> <br/> [...] <br/> <br/> 2. The minutes of the last meeting were read and signed. <br/> <br/> [...] <br/> <br/> 5. Alice Joselin introduced the subject of the evening by telling us something of the life of William Blake. Born in 1757 he was living through the beginning of the industrial revolution. He had no schooling but showed early artistic ability and was apprenticed for 7 years to an engraver. During this time he wrote some of his early poetry. Becoming himself a professional engraver he experimented with a new method of printing “<u>shown to him in a vision</u>”. As she traced the pattern of his life during the remaining 27 years, Alice Joselin gave us a portrait of an embittered man, never well loved even by his friends and incomprehensible to his contemporaries. She concluded with an extract from a Short Survey of William Blake by Quiller Couch. <br/> <br/> 6. F. E. Pollard said that he had been reluctant to undertake the task of talking to the Club on the literature of Wm. Blake since he was acquainted with only three of his poems. But as this was 50% more than anyone else knew, he need not have worried. He emphasised Blakes great lyrical gifts and his share in the poetic revolution of the C18th, even suggesting that Blake led the way. Frances Pollard illustrated his remarks by reading from: [“]To the evening star”, “How sweet I roam” and “Memory hither come”. He also read a short extract from Jerusalem throwing out the suggestion that the subject matter showed some influence of Thomas Payne, Quaker. <br/> <br/> 7. After some refreshment we welcomed to our meeting Mr. George Goyder who is a very keen student and collector of William Blake. It was a great privilege to have among us one whose profound knowledge of and enthusiasm for his subject was absolutely convincing. After listening to Mr. Goyder and looking at his many beautiful examples of Blake’s work, we were willing to allow that he is probably our greatest English artist and equalled as an engraver only by Dürer. <br/> <br/> The Chairman expressed our very warmest thanks to Mr. Goyder. <br/> <br/> [signed as a true record by] J. Knox Taylor 16/X/44."

Source


Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
EuRED : text provenance
TPR211 Reading

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Dilks, Margaret
Born in 2016

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
September 18 1944
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT111
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF2
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
It is assumed that it was Margaret Dilks, as secretary of the club, who read out the minutes of the previous meeting.<br/> Material by kind permission of the XII Book Club. For further information and permission to quote this source, contact the Reading Experience Database (http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/reading/contacts.php).

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:


http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/94150
Accessed on 2020/01/20 04:33:42

Related place
England
Related people
Dilks, Margaret
Related place
England
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        <p>
          <ptr target="ukred-30503">"Meeting held at 39, Eastern Avenue 18th Sept, 1944&lt;br/&gt;
    A. Bruce Dilks in the chair. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
[...] &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
2. The minutes of the last meeting were read and signed. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
[...] &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
5. Alice Joselin introduced the subject of the evening by telling us something of the life of William Blake. Born in 1757 he was living through the 
beginning of the industrial revolution. He had no schooling but showed early artistic ability and was apprenticed for 7 years to an engraver. During 
this time he wrote some of his early poetry. Becoming himself a professional engraver he experimented with a new method of printing “&lt;u&gt;shown 
to him in a vision&lt;/u&gt;”. As she traced the pattern of his life during the remaining 27 years, Alice Joselin gave us a portrait of an embittered man, 
never well loved even by his friends and incomprehensible to his contemporaries. She concluded with an extract from a Short Survey of William 
Blake by Quiller Couch. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
6. F. E. Pollard said that he had been reluctant to undertake the task of talking to the Club on the literature of Wm. Blake since he was acquainted 
with only three of his poems. But as this was 50% more than anyone else knew, he need not have worried. He emphasised Blakes great lyrical 
gifts and his share in the poetic revolution of the C18th, even suggesting that Blake led the way. Frances Pollard illustrated his remarks by reading 
from: [“]To the evening star”, “How sweet I roam” and “Memory hither come”. He also read a short extract from Jerusalem throwing out the 
suggestion that the subject matter showed some influence of Thomas Payne, Quaker. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
7. After some refreshment we welcomed to our meeting Mr. George Goyder who is a very keen student and collector of William Blake. It was a 
great privilege to have among us one whose profound knowledge of and enthusiasm for his subject was absolutely convincing. After listening to Mr. 
Goyder and looking at his many beautiful examples of Blake’s work, we were willing to allow that he is probably our greatest English artist and 
equalled as an engraver only by Dürer. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
The Chairman expressed our very warmest thanks to Mr. Goyder. &lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
[signed as a true record by] J. Knox Taylor 16/X/44."</ptr>
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