The Earthly Paradise

Reading experience

?itemComments

The Earthly Paradise

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-29742

Evidence

"Meeting held at Hillsborough, Glebe Road: 15. V. 34.<br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Reginald H. Robson in the chair.<br/> <br/> 1. Minutes of last read & approved<br/> <br/> [...]<br/> <br/> 6. And so we turned, a little wistfully maybe, to Charles Stansfield reading from the “Earthy Paradise”, & its rather pathetic refrain “The idle singer of an empty day”. The word pictures of the Greek and Norse myths came vividly before our minds, and their beauty drew us very pleasantly.<br/> <br/> 7. Frank Pollard then gave us a general survey of Morris and his work, & Mary Pollard read a short poem. Those who had some familiarity with Morris’s writings compared their impressions & the rest of us caught something of Morris’s desire to present a different world from the unpleasant one he lived in, and also of the joy we have in praising great men and how we turn their stories over. The contribution of Morris, we gathered, was not so much the foregoing of life in order to live in some deeper sense, but the happier if less heroic creation of a life in some considerable accordance with his own ideals.<br/> <br/> 8. Howard Smith then talked to us of William Morris’s Prose Romances and read us extracts from them. These romances were turned off, we were told, during his leisure evenings in a thoroughly matter of fact manner reminding us perhaps of Trollope. But they were crammed full of the fanciful & even the fantastic. Not only did the author draw upon his imagination for quaint names like Utterhay, Evilshore, Bindalone: he also freely indulged his fancy for archaic expressions &mdash; hard by, whilom, Child (with capital C), dight, gayass[?], hight (for named) are a few examples.<br/> <br/> 9. Finally we heard from Reginald Robson an extract from “News from Nowhere.” In this ideal world of the poet’s dreaming there was no meanness and no money, no jarring jangle of train or tram with rolling smoke or strident screech, nothing more disturbing than the quiet plash of the oar upon the tranquil surface of the Thames. It may be that the the rowing boat was once itself anathema to the aesthetes of an earlier age, but for Morris its very antiquity had hallowed its shapely curves. Is it as well that he did not live to see the vermillion sports car [...]?"

Source


Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Stansfield, Charles E.
Aged 64 [Experience in 1934, born in 1870]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
May 15 1934
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT111
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF2
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Material by kind permission of the XII Book Club. For further information and permission to quote this source, contact the Reading Experience Database (http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/reading/contacts.php).

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:


http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/92761
Accessed on 2020/02/27 11:38:11

Related place
England
Related people
Stansfield, Charles E.
Related place
England
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&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;Reginald H. Robson in the chair.&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
1. Minutes of last read &amp; approved&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
[...]&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
6. And so we turned, a little wistfully maybe, to Charles Stansfield reading from the “Earthy 
Paradise”, &amp; its rather pathetic refrain “The idle singer of an empty day”. The word pictures of the 
Greek and Norse myths came vividly before our minds, and their beauty drew us very pleasantly.&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
7. Frank Pollard then gave us a general survey of Morris and his work, &amp; Mary Pollard read a short 
poem. Those who had some familiarity with Morris’s writings compared their impressions &amp; the rest 
of us caught something of Morris’s desire to present a different world from the unpleasant one he 
lived in, and also of the joy we have in praising great men and how we turn their stories over. The 
contribution of Morris, we gathered, was not so much the foregoing of life in order to live in some 
deeper sense, but the happier if less heroic creation of a life in some considerable accordance with 
his own ideals.&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
8. Howard Smith then talked to us of William Morris’s Prose Romances and read us extracts from 
them. These romances were turned off, we were told, during his leisure evenings in a thoroughly 
matter of fact manner reminding us perhaps of Trollope. But they were crammed full of the fanciful 
&amp; even the fantastic. Not only did the author draw upon his imagination for quaint names like 
Utterhay, Evilshore, Bindalone: he also freely indulged his fancy for archaic expressions &amp;mdash; hard by, 
whilom, Child (with capital C), dight, gayass[?], hight (for named) are a few examples.&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
9. Finally we heard from Reginald Robson an extract from “News from Nowhere.” In this ideal world 
of the poet’s dreaming there was no meanness and no money, no jarring jangle of train or tram 
with rolling smoke or strident screech, nothing more disturbing than the quiet plash of the oar upon 
the tranquil surface of the Thames. It may be that the the rowing boat was once itself anathema to 
the aesthetes of an earlier age, but for Morris its very antiquity had hallowed its shapely curves. Is 
it as well that he did not live to see the vermillion sports car [...]?"</ptr>
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?itemComments

The Earthly Paradise

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-29742

Evidence

"Meeting held at Hillsborough, Glebe Road: 15. V. 34.<br/> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Reginald H. Robson in the chair.<br/> <br/> 1. Minutes of last read & approved<br/> <br/> [...]<br/> <br/> 6. And so we turned, a little wistfully maybe, to Charles Stansfield reading from the “Earthy Paradise”, & its rather pathetic refrain “The idle singer of an empty day”. The word pictures of the Greek and Norse myths came vividly before our minds, and their beauty drew us very pleasantly.<br/> <br/> 7. Frank Pollard then gave us a general survey of Morris and his work, & Mary Pollard read a short poem. Those who had some familiarity with Morris’s writings compared their impressions & the rest of us caught something of Morris’s desire to present a different world from the unpleasant one he lived in, and also of the joy we have in praising great men and how we turn their stories over. The contribution of Morris, we gathered, was not so much the foregoing of life in order to live in some deeper sense, but the happier if less heroic creation of a life in some considerable accordance with his own ideals.<br/> <br/> 8. Howard Smith then talked to us of William Morris’s Prose Romances and read us extracts from them. These romances were turned off, we were told, during his leisure evenings in a thoroughly matter of fact manner reminding us perhaps of Trollope. But they were crammed full of the fanciful & even the fantastic. Not only did the author draw upon his imagination for quaint names like Utterhay, Evilshore, Bindalone: he also freely indulged his fancy for archaic expressions &mdash; hard by, whilom, Child (with capital C), dight, gayass[?], hight (for named) are a few examples.<br/> <br/> 9. Finally we heard from Reginald Robson an extract from “News from Nowhere.” In this ideal world of the poet’s dreaming there was no meanness and no money, no jarring jangle of train or tram with rolling smoke or strident screech, nothing more disturbing than the quiet plash of the oar upon the tranquil surface of the Thames. It may be that the the rowing boat was once itself anathema to the aesthetes of an earlier age, but for Morris its very antiquity had hallowed its shapely curves. Is it as well that he did not live to see the vermillion sports car [...]?"

Source


Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Stansfield, Charles E.
Aged 64 [Experience in 1934, born in 1870]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
May 15 1934
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT111
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF2
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Material by kind permission of the XII Book Club. For further information and permission to quote this source, contact the Reading Experience Database (http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/reading/contacts.php).

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:


http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/92761
Accessed on 2020/02/27 11:38:11

Related place
England
Related people
Stansfield, Charles E.
Related place
England
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        <p>
          <ptr target="ukred-29742">"Meeting held at Hillsborough, Glebe Road: 15. V. 34.&lt;br/&gt;
&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;Reginald H. Robson in the chair.&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
1. Minutes of last read &amp; approved&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
[...]&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
6. And so we turned, a little wistfully maybe, to Charles Stansfield reading from the “Earthy 
Paradise”, &amp; its rather pathetic refrain “The idle singer of an empty day”. The word pictures of the 
Greek and Norse myths came vividly before our minds, and their beauty drew us very pleasantly.&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
7. Frank Pollard then gave us a general survey of Morris and his work, &amp; Mary Pollard read a short 
poem. Those who had some familiarity with Morris’s writings compared their impressions &amp; the rest 
of us caught something of Morris’s desire to present a different world from the unpleasant one he 
lived in, and also of the joy we have in praising great men and how we turn their stories over. The 
contribution of Morris, we gathered, was not so much the foregoing of life in order to live in some 
deeper sense, but the happier if less heroic creation of a life in some considerable accordance with 
his own ideals.&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
8. Howard Smith then talked to us of William Morris’s Prose Romances and read us extracts from 
them. These romances were turned off, we were told, during his leisure evenings in a thoroughly 
matter of fact manner reminding us perhaps of Trollope. But they were crammed full of the fanciful 
&amp; even the fantastic. Not only did the author draw upon his imagination for quaint names like 
Utterhay, Evilshore, Bindalone: he also freely indulged his fancy for archaic expressions &amp;mdash; hard by, 
whilom, Child (with capital C), dight, gayass[?], hight (for named) are a few examples.&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
9. Finally we heard from Reginald Robson an extract from “News from Nowhere.” In this ideal world 
of the poet’s dreaming there was no meanness and no money, no jarring jangle of train or tram 
with rolling smoke or strident screech, nothing more disturbing than the quiet plash of the oar upon 
the tranquil surface of the Thames. It may be that the the rowing boat was once itself anathema to 
the aesthetes of an earlier age, but for Morris its very antiquity had hallowed its shapely curves. Is 
it as well that he did not live to see the vermillion sports car [...]?"</ptr>
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