Wuthering Heights

Reading experience

?itemComments

Wuthering Heights

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-28618

Evidence

Algernon Charles Swinburne to Sir T. Wemyss Reid, in letter responding to Reid"s Charlotte Bronte: A Monograph, 24 September 1877: <br/><br/> "The only reference [...] in your book which seemed to indicate a different point of view from my own was the passage in which you seem to deprecate the tone of, of not to depreciate the merit, of ""Wuthering Heights."" Many years ago I lent a copy of that book to a lady of the class described in it &mdash; daughter of a Westmoreland ""statesman"" or small gentleman-farmer living on his own land &mdash; warning her that though I liked it very much I knew that people in general called it ""horrible,"" &c &c. She returned it to me, after reading it through, with the remark that [...] she had known wilder instances of lawless and law-defying passion and tyranny, far more horrible than any cruelty of Heathcliff"s, in her own immediate neighbourhood. One of them, which even the Titaness Emily Bronte would have shrunk from telling in print, was the Cenci story done over again by a ""statesman,"" who having bullied his wife to death was left alone in the farm with a beautiful daughter, whom he used with horrible brutality [i.e. raped] &mdash; and his character was such that all the neighbours said it was monstrous that the wretched girl should be left alone in the house with him &mdash; but nobody would come forward and ""bell the cat"" &mdash; and the end of it was that she was seen late one evening flying out of the house, with all her clothes disordered [...] evidently raving mad, towards the river Eden [...] and was fished out dead next morning. And I knew one of the women who for charity"s sake went to nurse or sit up with the horrible old father &mdash; and said ""she never could have imagined anything so unutterably dreadful as that deathbed"" &mdash; and, if I remember rightly, that he raved for three days and nights before death came to release him and rid the world of him. Now, seeing that Emily Bronte was a tragic poet, and reared in the same degree of latitude which bred this humble version of the ""Cenci,"" I cannot think that anything in her book is at all excessive or unjustifiable."

Source

The Brontes: Their Lives, Friendships, and Correspondence

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR201 Borrowed informaly

Reader(s) and listener(s)



Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes


How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

The Brontes: Their Lives, Friendships, and Correspondence
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/90731
Accessed on 2020/04/05 09:11:54

Related person
Related text or manuscript
The Brontes: Their Lives, Friendships, and Correspondence
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE TEI PUBLIC "customisation-tei/tei_readingExp.dtd" "">
<TEI xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0">
  <teiHeader>
    <fileDesc>
      <titleStmt>
        <author>
          <persName>
            <forename>Emily</forename>
            <surname>Bront&amp;euml;</surname>
          </persName>
        </author>
        <title>Wuthering Heights</title>
      </titleStmt>
      <sourceDesc>
        <biblStruct>
          <monogr>
            <author>
              <persName>
                <forename/>
                <surname/>
              </persName>
            </author>
            <title>The Brontes: Their Lives, Friendships, and Correspondence</title>
            <imprint>
              <publisher>Thomas James Wise and John Alexander Symington</publisher>
              <pubPlace>Oxford</pubPlace>
              <date>1980</date>
            </imprint>
            <availability/>
            <biblScope/>
          </monogr>
        </biblStruct>
      </sourceDesc>
      <notesStmt>
        <note>xml/ukred-28618.xml</note>
      </notesStmt>
    </fileDesc>
    <profileDesc>
      <correspDesc>
        <correspAction type="sending">
          <persName>
            <forename/>
            <surname/>
          </persName>
        </correspAction>
        <correspAction type="receiving">
          <persName>
            <forename/>
            <surname/>
          </persName>
        </correspAction>
      </correspDesc>
      <langUsage/>
    </profileDesc>
    <experienceDesc>
      <experience ref="ukred-28618">
        <respStmt resp="submitter">
          <resp>submitted by</resp>
          <persName>
            <forename>Jenny</forename>
            <surname>McAuley</surname>
          </persName>
          <address>
            <address_line/>
          </address>
          <email>jennymcauley@hotmail.com</email>
        </respStmt>
        <respStmt resp="editor"/>
        <date cert="unknown"/>
        <time/>
        <reader>
          <persName>
            <forename>anon</forename>
            <surname/>
          </persName>
          <sex>F</sex>
          <age>Adult (18-100+)</age>
          <education scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/education"/>
          <birth/>
          <readerStatus scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/reader_status"/>
        </reader>
        <listener/>
        <place>
          <location>
            <county>Cumbria</county>
            <district/>
          </location>
        </place>
        <textRead>
          <author>
            <persName>
              <forename>Emily</forename>
              <surname>Bront&amp;euml;</surname>
            </persName>
          </author>
          <title>Wuthering Heights</title>
          <genre scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/genre" ref="GEN3">Fiction</genre>
          <textProvenance ref="TPR201 Borrowed informaly" scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_provenance">(relations)</textProvenance>
          <textStatus ref="TST4" scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_status">Unknown</textStatus>
          <textForm scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_form" ref="TFO02">Book</textForm>
          <origLanguage>
            <language/>
          </origLanguage>
          <textStatus scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_status"/>
        </textRead>
        <readingExp>
          <experienceType scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/experience_type" ref="EXT13">Unknown</experienceType>
          <posture scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/posture"/>
          <lighting scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/lighting"/>
          <environment scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/environment"/>
          <intensity scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/intensity"/>
          <emotion scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/emotion"/>
          <testimony scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/testimony"/>
          <sourceReliability scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/source_reliability"/>
          <expFrequency scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/experience_frequency" ref="EXF3">Unknown</expFrequency>
          <note/>
        </readingExp>
      </experience>
    </experienceDesc>
  </teiHeader>
  <text>
    <body>
      <div type="volume" n="01:02">
        <p>
          <ptr target="ukred-28618">Algernon Charles Swinburne to Sir T. Wemyss Reid, in letter responding to Reid"s Charlotte Bronte: A Monograph, 24 September 1877:
&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt;
"The only reference [...] in your book which seemed to indicate a different point of view from my own was the passage in which you seem to deprecate the tone of, of not to depreciate the merit, of ""Wuthering Heights."" Many years ago I lent a copy of that book to a lady of the class described in it &amp;mdash; daughter of a Westmoreland ""statesman"" or small gentleman-farmer living on his own land &amp;mdash; warning her that though I liked it very much I knew that people in general called it ""horrible,"" &amp;c &amp;c. She returned it to me, after reading it through, with the remark that [...] she had known wilder instances of lawless and law-defying passion and tyranny, far more horrible than any cruelty of Heathcliff"s, in her own immediate neighbourhood. One of them, which even the Titaness Emily Bronte would have shrunk from telling in print, was the Cenci story done over again by a ""statesman,"" who having bullied his wife to death was left alone in the farm with a beautiful daughter, whom he used with horrible brutality [i.e. raped] &amp;mdash; and his character was such that all the neighbours said it was monstrous that the wretched girl should be left alone in the house with him &amp;mdash; but nobody would come forward and ""bell the cat"" &amp;mdash; and the end of it was that she was seen late one evening flying out of the house, with all her clothes disordered [...] evidently raving mad, towards the river Eden [...] and was fished out dead next morning. And I knew one of the women who for charity"s sake went to nurse or sit up with the horrible old father &amp;mdash; and said ""she never could have imagined anything so unutterably dreadful as that deathbed"" &amp;mdash; and, if I remember rightly, that he raved for three days and nights before death came to release him and rid the world of him. Now, seeing that Emily Bronte was a tragic poet, and reared in the same degree of latitude which bred this humble version of the ""Cenci,"" I cannot think that anything in her book is at all excessive or unjustifiable."</ptr>
        </p>
      </div>
    </body>
  </text>
</TEI>
?itemComments

Wuthering Heights

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-28618

Evidence

Algernon Charles Swinburne to Sir T. Wemyss Reid, in letter responding to Reid"s Charlotte Bronte: A Monograph, 24 September 1877: <br/><br/> "The only reference [...] in your book which seemed to indicate a different point of view from my own was the passage in which you seem to deprecate the tone of, of not to depreciate the merit, of ""Wuthering Heights."" Many years ago I lent a copy of that book to a lady of the class described in it &mdash; daughter of a Westmoreland ""statesman"" or small gentleman-farmer living on his own land &mdash; warning her that though I liked it very much I knew that people in general called it ""horrible,"" &c &c. She returned it to me, after reading it through, with the remark that [...] she had known wilder instances of lawless and law-defying passion and tyranny, far more horrible than any cruelty of Heathcliff"s, in her own immediate neighbourhood. One of them, which even the Titaness Emily Bronte would have shrunk from telling in print, was the Cenci story done over again by a ""statesman,"" who having bullied his wife to death was left alone in the farm with a beautiful daughter, whom he used with horrible brutality [i.e. raped] &mdash; and his character was such that all the neighbours said it was monstrous that the wretched girl should be left alone in the house with him &mdash; but nobody would come forward and ""bell the cat"" &mdash; and the end of it was that she was seen late one evening flying out of the house, with all her clothes disordered [...] evidently raving mad, towards the river Eden [...] and was fished out dead next morning. And I knew one of the women who for charity"s sake went to nurse or sit up with the horrible old father &mdash; and said ""she never could have imagined anything so unutterably dreadful as that deathbed"" &mdash; and, if I remember rightly, that he raved for three days and nights before death came to release him and rid the world of him. Now, seeing that Emily Bronte was a tragic poet, and reared in the same degree of latitude which bred this humble version of the ""Cenci,"" I cannot think that anything in her book is at all excessive or unjustifiable."

Source

The Brontes: Their Lives, Friendships, and Correspondence

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR201 Borrowed informaly

Reader(s) and listener(s)



Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes


How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

The Brontes: Their Lives, Friendships, and Correspondence
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/90731
Accessed on 2020/04/05 09:11:54

Related person
Related text or manuscript
The Brontes: Their Lives, Friendships, and Correspondence
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE TEI PUBLIC "customisation-tei/tei_readingExp.dtd" "">
<TEI xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0">
  <teiHeader>
    <fileDesc>
      <titleStmt>
        <author>
          <persName>
            <forename>Emily</forename>
            <surname>Bront&amp;euml;</surname>
          </persName>
        </author>
        <title>Wuthering Heights</title>
      </titleStmt>
      <sourceDesc>
        <biblStruct>
          <monogr>
            <author>
              <persName>
                <forename/>
                <surname/>
              </persName>
            </author>
            <title>The Brontes: Their Lives, Friendships, and Correspondence</title>
            <imprint>
              <publisher>Thomas James Wise and John Alexander Symington</publisher>
              <pubPlace>Oxford</pubPlace>
              <date>1980</date>
            </imprint>
            <availability/>
            <biblScope/>
          </monogr>
        </biblStruct>
      </sourceDesc>
      <notesStmt>
        <note>xml/ukred-28618.xml</note>
      </notesStmt>
    </fileDesc>
    <profileDesc>
      <correspDesc>
        <correspAction type="sending">
          <persName>
            <forename/>
            <surname/>
          </persName>
        </correspAction>
        <correspAction type="receiving">
          <persName>
            <forename/>
            <surname/>
          </persName>
        </correspAction>
      </correspDesc>
      <langUsage/>
    </profileDesc>
    <experienceDesc>
      <experience ref="ukred-28618">
        <respStmt resp="submitter">
          <resp>submitted by</resp>
          <persName>
            <forename>Jenny</forename>
            <surname>McAuley</surname>
          </persName>
          <address>
            <address_line/>
          </address>
          <email>jennymcauley@hotmail.com</email>
        </respStmt>
        <respStmt resp="editor"/>
        <date cert="unknown"/>
        <time/>
        <reader>
          <persName>
            <forename>anon</forename>
            <surname/>
          </persName>
          <sex>F</sex>
          <age>Adult (18-100+)</age>
          <education scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/education"/>
          <birth/>
          <readerStatus scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/reader_status"/>
        </reader>
        <listener/>
        <place>
          <location>
            <county>Cumbria</county>
            <district/>
          </location>
        </place>
        <textRead>
          <author>
            <persName>
              <forename>Emily</forename>
              <surname>Bront&amp;euml;</surname>
            </persName>
          </author>
          <title>Wuthering Heights</title>
          <genre scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/genre" ref="GEN3">Fiction</genre>
          <textProvenance ref="TPR201 Borrowed informaly" scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_provenance">(relations)</textProvenance>
          <textStatus ref="TST4" scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_status">Unknown</textStatus>
          <textForm scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_form" ref="TFO02">Book</textForm>
          <origLanguage>
            <language/>
          </origLanguage>
          <textStatus scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_status"/>
        </textRead>
        <readingExp>
          <experienceType scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/experience_type" ref="EXT13">Unknown</experienceType>
          <posture scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/posture"/>
          <lighting scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/lighting"/>
          <environment scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/environment"/>
          <intensity scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/intensity"/>
          <emotion scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/emotion"/>
          <testimony scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/testimony"/>
          <sourceReliability scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/source_reliability"/>
          <expFrequency scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/experience_frequency" ref="EXF3">Unknown</expFrequency>
          <note/>
        </readingExp>
      </experience>
    </experienceDesc>
  </teiHeader>
  <text>
    <body>
      <div type="volume" n="01:02">
        <p>
          <ptr target="ukred-28618">Algernon Charles Swinburne to Sir T. Wemyss Reid, in letter responding to Reid"s Charlotte Bronte: A Monograph, 24 September 1877:
&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt;
"The only reference [...] in your book which seemed to indicate a different point of view from my own was the passage in which you seem to deprecate the tone of, of not to depreciate the merit, of ""Wuthering Heights."" Many years ago I lent a copy of that book to a lady of the class described in it &amp;mdash; daughter of a Westmoreland ""statesman"" or small gentleman-farmer living on his own land &amp;mdash; warning her that though I liked it very much I knew that people in general called it ""horrible,"" &amp;c &amp;c. She returned it to me, after reading it through, with the remark that [...] she had known wilder instances of lawless and law-defying passion and tyranny, far more horrible than any cruelty of Heathcliff"s, in her own immediate neighbourhood. One of them, which even the Titaness Emily Bronte would have shrunk from telling in print, was the Cenci story done over again by a ""statesman,"" who having bullied his wife to death was left alone in the farm with a beautiful daughter, whom he used with horrible brutality [i.e. raped] &amp;mdash; and his character was such that all the neighbours said it was monstrous that the wretched girl should be left alone in the house with him &amp;mdash; but nobody would come forward and ""bell the cat"" &amp;mdash; and the end of it was that she was seen late one evening flying out of the house, with all her clothes disordered [...] evidently raving mad, towards the river Eden [...] and was fished out dead next morning. And I knew one of the women who for charity"s sake went to nurse or sit up with the horrible old father &amp;mdash; and said ""she never could have imagined anything so unutterably dreadful as that deathbed"" &amp;mdash; and, if I remember rightly, that he raved for three days and nights before death came to release him and rid the world of him. Now, seeing that Emily Bronte was a tragic poet, and reared in the same degree of latitude which bred this humble version of the ""Cenci,"" I cannot think that anything in her book is at all excessive or unjustifiable."</ptr>
        </p>
      </div>
    </body>
  </text>
</TEI>