Lady Chatterley's Lover

Reading experience

?itemComments

Lady Chatterley's Lover

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-26391

Evidence

"On the way up I read Lady Chatterley"s Lover, in the new full continental edition a friend got from Germany. I now retract what I said that DHL"s letters are more important than his novel. Lady C. is a vastly important book. I understand it. I understand it as necessary. It is delicate and pure. One of the purest things I have ever read. It is far too long. But the strong necessary teaching is there. In parts its as direct and simple as the Bible. Its an amazing love-song; no not a love-song, a life-song. It has given me confidence and courage. It could purge the world.Nevertheless I feel its a thing, a teaching, I must take and pass. I could not stay just in that region. That was Lawrence. But I feel that my goal is quite different. I salute Lady Chatterley, & I will not say leave it behind, but leave it aside. As I said in my last, sex is to art what sleep is to waking life. Full spiritual wakefulness is without sex & is a new innocence, a new childishness if you like."

Source

Dear Lady Ginger an exhange of letters between Lady Ottoline Morrell and D'Arcy Cresswell together with Ottoline Morrell's essay on Katherine Mansfield.

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
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Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
D'Arcy Cresswell, Walter
Aged 37 [Experience in 1933, born in 1896]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
June 15 - July 7 1933
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
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EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
This is an extract of a letter to Ottoline Morrell dated July 7(circa)1933 and refers to previous correspondence about Lawrence;specifically a letter dated early June 1933 where Cresswell writes 'Lawrence's letters will, I believe, rank above his books, tho' not above his paintings.' It is perhaps worth noting that at the time of writing, Cresswell had 'left home suddenly, with all my baggage & no money'. This and his financial circumstances having forced Cresswell to leave England(and the literary company that circled around Ottoline)and return to his parents' home in New Zealand might account for the emotive nature of his response to the Novel.He writes of relief 'to have left the great mountain chain which was oppressing me'.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Dear Lady Ginger an exhange of letters between Lady Ottoline Morrell and D'Arcy Cresswell together with Ottoline Morrell's essay on Katherine Mansfield.
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/86770
Accessed on 2020/02/18 14:40:46

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?itemComments

Lady Chatterley's Lover

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-26391

Evidence

"On the way up I read Lady Chatterley"s Lover, in the new full continental edition a friend got from Germany. I now retract what I said that DHL"s letters are more important than his novel. Lady C. is a vastly important book. I understand it. I understand it as necessary. It is delicate and pure. One of the purest things I have ever read. It is far too long. But the strong necessary teaching is there. In parts its as direct and simple as the Bible. Its an amazing love-song; no not a love-song, a life-song. It has given me confidence and courage. It could purge the world.Nevertheless I feel its a thing, a teaching, I must take and pass. I could not stay just in that region. That was Lawrence. But I feel that my goal is quite different. I salute Lady Chatterley, & I will not say leave it behind, but leave it aside. As I said in my last, sex is to art what sleep is to waking life. Full spiritual wakefulness is without sex & is a new innocence, a new childishness if you like."

Source

Dear Lady Ginger an exhange of letters between Lady Ottoline Morrell and D'Arcy Cresswell together with Ottoline Morrell's essay on Katherine Mansfield.

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
D'Arcy Cresswell, Walter
Aged 37 [Experience in 1933, born in 1896]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
June 15 - July 7 1933
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT122
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
This is an extract of a letter to Ottoline Morrell dated July 7(circa)1933 and refers to previous correspondence about Lawrence;specifically a letter dated early June 1933 where Cresswell writes 'Lawrence's letters will, I believe, rank above his books, tho' not above his paintings.' It is perhaps worth noting that at the time of writing, Cresswell had 'left home suddenly, with all my baggage & no money'. This and his financial circumstances having forced Cresswell to leave England(and the literary company that circled around Ottoline)and return to his parents' home in New Zealand might account for the emotive nature of his response to the Novel.He writes of relief 'to have left the great mountain chain which was oppressing me'.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Dear Lady Ginger an exhange of letters between Lady Ottoline Morrell and D'Arcy Cresswell together with Ottoline Morrell's essay on Katherine Mansfield.
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/86770
Accessed on 2020/02/18 14:40:46

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