Vulgarity in Literature

Reading experience

?itemComments

Vulgarity in Literature

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-24691

Evidence

"Today I bought and read Aldous Huxley"s essay Vulgarity in Literature. It"s a surprisingly powerful thing, one of those treats in reading, of which our modern authors never afford me more than one a year. But much of the lighter pleasure it gave me was due to my having met him last week at your house & all the time he seemed to be saying it inside your amber drawing-room; ( where by the way I usually feel like a fly in amber). so I think I must thank you for what a great pleasure my last visit has brought me."

Source

Dear Lady Ginger an exchange of letters between Lady Ottoline Morrell and D'Arcy Cresswell together with Ottoline's Morrell's essay on Katherine Mansfield

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO18
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Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
D'Arcy Cresswell, Walter
Aged 35 [Experience in 1931, born in 1896]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
April 1 1931
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT122
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF2
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
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Notes
This is an extract from a letter to Ottoline Morrell with whom D'Arcy Cresswell maintained a correspondence from 1930 until her death in April 1938. The occasion of meeting Huxley that D'Arcy Cresswell refers to would have doubtless been at one of her 'Thursdays' at 10 Gower Street to which she invited writers, artists and philosophers; acting as hostess and patron, encouraging them to meet and build relationships to further their talents. A young New Zealand poet, Cresswell had been lionized by the literary world following the 1930 publication of an autobiographical prose work 'The Poet's Progress'. As a notable influence on both Cresswell and Ottoline Morrell, Aldous Huxley was to continue to be a subject of letters between the two.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Dear Lady Ginger an exchange of letters between Lady Ottoline Morrell and D'Arcy Cresswell together with Ottoline's Morrell's essay on Katherine Mansfield
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/83942
Accessed on 2019/12/06 22:07:46

Related place
England
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?itemComments

Vulgarity in Literature

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-24691

Evidence

"Today I bought and read Aldous Huxley"s essay Vulgarity in Literature. It"s a surprisingly powerful thing, one of those treats in reading, of which our modern authors never afford me more than one a year. But much of the lighter pleasure it gave me was due to my having met him last week at your house & all the time he seemed to be saying it inside your amber drawing-room; ( where by the way I usually feel like a fly in amber). so I think I must thank you for what a great pleasure my last visit has brought me."

Source

Dear Lady Ginger an exchange of letters between Lady Ottoline Morrell and D'Arcy Cresswell together with Ottoline's Morrell's essay on Katherine Mansfield

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO18
EuRED : text provenance
TPR207

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
D'Arcy Cresswell, Walter
Aged 35 [Experience in 1931, born in 1896]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
April 1 1931
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT122
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF2
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
This is an extract from a letter to Ottoline Morrell with whom D'Arcy Cresswell maintained a correspondence from 1930 until her death in April 1938. The occasion of meeting Huxley that D'Arcy Cresswell refers to would have doubtless been at one of her 'Thursdays' at 10 Gower Street to which she invited writers, artists and philosophers; acting as hostess and patron, encouraging them to meet and build relationships to further their talents. A young New Zealand poet, Cresswell had been lionized by the literary world following the 1930 publication of an autobiographical prose work 'The Poet's Progress'. As a notable influence on both Cresswell and Ottoline Morrell, Aldous Huxley was to continue to be a subject of letters between the two.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Dear Lady Ginger an exchange of letters between Lady Ottoline Morrell and D'Arcy Cresswell together with Ottoline's Morrell's essay on Katherine Mansfield
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/83942
Accessed on 2019/12/06 22:07:46

Related place
England
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