The Bubble: A Poem; aka, The South Sea Project

Reading experience

?itemComments

The Bubble: A Poem; aka, The South Sea Project

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-22947

Evidence

"The two [italics] wittiest [end italics] things in our Language in Verse & Prose are Dr Young"s Conjectures on Original Composition I think, and Dr Swift"s Ballad on the South Sea. The two Tragedies which go nearest one"s Heart I think - in our Language I mean - are Southern"s Fatal Marriage and Lillo"s Fatal Curiosity. The two best Comic Scenes in our Language according to my Taste are the Scene between Squire Richard & Myrtilla in the Provoked Husband, and that between Sir Joseph Wittol, Nol Bluff and Sharper in the Old Batchelor - not the kicking scene but the friendly one. The two best [italics] Declamatory [end italics] Scenes where the Sentiments and Language are most perfect, seem to be the Scene between Juba and Syphax in Addison"s Cato, & that between the two Ladies in Johnson"s Irene. I know that both are unDramatic, the latter more peculiarly so, than ever was, or ever ought to have been hazarded - but for Language & Sentiment it is most Superb. - Superieure as the French say. Johnson says the finest Tragic Scene in our Language, for Drama sentiment, Language, Power over the Heart, & every Requisite for Theatre or Closet, is the Tomb Scene in the Mourning Bride. [italics] I [end italics] think, that trying to be [italics] every [end italics] thing it escapes being [italics] anything [end italics]"

Source

Thraliana

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO24
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Thrale, Hester Lynch
Born in 1741

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
This is probably the right poem, though it seems he wrote several on the South Sea Bubble

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Thraliana
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/81367
Accessed on 2021/01/28 16:55:12

Related people
Thrale, Hester Lynch
Related text or manuscript
Thraliana
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE TEI PUBLIC "customisation-tei/tei_readingExp.dtd" "">
<TEI xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0">
  <teiHeader>
    <fileDesc>
      <titleStmt>
        <author>
          <persName>
            <forename>Jonathan</forename>
            <surname>Swift</surname>
          </persName>
        </author>
        <title>The Bubble: A Poem; aka, The South Sea Project</title>
      </titleStmt>
      <sourceDesc>
        <biblStruct>
          <monogr>
            <author>
              <persName>
                <forename>Hester Lynch</forename>
                <surname>Thrale</surname>
              </persName>
            </author>
            <title>Thraliana</title>
            <imprint>
              <publisher>Katharine C. Balderston</publisher>
              <pubPlace>Oxford</pubPlace>
              <date>1951</date>
            </imprint>
            <availability/>
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    <experienceDesc>
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        <respStmt resp="submitter">
          <resp>submitted by</resp>
          <persName>
            <forename>Sarah</forename>
            <surname>Johnson</surname>
          </persName>
          <address>
            <address_line/>
          </address>
          <email>saj28@cam.ac.uk</email>
        </respStmt>
        <respStmt resp="editor"/>
        <date to="1778-12-31" cert="unknown">   - Dec 31 1778</date>
        <time/>
        <reader>
          <persName>
            <forename>Hester Lynch</forename>
            <surname>Thrale</surname>
          </persName>
          <sex>F</sex>
          <age>Adult (18-100+)</age>
          <education scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/education"/>
          <birth>1741-01-27</birth>
          <country>Wales</country>
          <readerStatus scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/reader_status"/>
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              <forename>Jonathan</forename>
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          <expFrequency scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/experience_frequency" ref="EXF3">Unknown</expFrequency>
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          <ptr target="ukred-22947">"The two [italics] wittiest [end italics] things in our Language in Verse &amp; Prose are Dr Young"s Conjectures on Original Composition I think, and Dr Swift"s Ballad on the South Sea.

The two Tragedies which go nearest one"s Heart I think - in our Language I mean - are Southern"s Fatal Marriage and Lillo"s Fatal Curiosity.

The two best Comic Scenes in our Language according to my Taste are the Scene between Squire Richard &amp; Myrtilla in the Provoked Husband, and that between Sir Joseph Wittol, Nol Bluff and Sharper in the Old Batchelor - not the kicking scene but the friendly one.

The two best [italics] Declamatory [end italics] Scenes where the Sentiments and Language are most perfect, seem to be the Scene between Juba and Syphax in Addison"s Cato, &amp; that between the two Ladies in Johnson"s Irene. I know that both are unDramatic, the latter more peculiarly so, than ever was, or ever ought to have been hazarded - but for Language &amp; Sentiment it is most Superb. - Superieure as the French say.

Johnson says the finest Tragic Scene in our Language, for Drama sentiment, Language, Power over the Heart, &amp; every Requisite for Theatre or Closet, is the Tomb Scene in the Mourning Bride.
[italics] I [end italics] think, that trying to be [italics] every [end italics] thing it escapes being [italics] anything [end italics]"


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?itemComments

The Bubble: A Poem; aka, The South Sea Project

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-22947

Evidence

"The two [italics] wittiest [end italics] things in our Language in Verse & Prose are Dr Young"s Conjectures on Original Composition I think, and Dr Swift"s Ballad on the South Sea. The two Tragedies which go nearest one"s Heart I think - in our Language I mean - are Southern"s Fatal Marriage and Lillo"s Fatal Curiosity. The two best Comic Scenes in our Language according to my Taste are the Scene between Squire Richard & Myrtilla in the Provoked Husband, and that between Sir Joseph Wittol, Nol Bluff and Sharper in the Old Batchelor - not the kicking scene but the friendly one. The two best [italics] Declamatory [end italics] Scenes where the Sentiments and Language are most perfect, seem to be the Scene between Juba and Syphax in Addison"s Cato, & that between the two Ladies in Johnson"s Irene. I know that both are unDramatic, the latter more peculiarly so, than ever was, or ever ought to have been hazarded - but for Language & Sentiment it is most Superb. - Superieure as the French say. Johnson says the finest Tragic Scene in our Language, for Drama sentiment, Language, Power over the Heart, & every Requisite for Theatre or Closet, is the Tomb Scene in the Mourning Bride. [italics] I [end italics] think, that trying to be [italics] every [end italics] thing it escapes being [italics] anything [end italics]"

Source

Thraliana

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO24
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Thrale, Hester Lynch
Born in 1741

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
This is probably the right poem, though it seems he wrote several on the South Sea Bubble

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Thraliana
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/81367
Accessed on 2021/01/28 16:55:12

Related people
Thrale, Hester Lynch
Related text or manuscript
Thraliana
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE TEI PUBLIC "customisation-tei/tei_readingExp.dtd" "">
<TEI xmlns="http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0">
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        <author>
          <persName>
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            <surname>Swift</surname>
          </persName>
        </author>
        <title>The Bubble: A Poem; aka, The South Sea Project</title>
      </titleStmt>
      <sourceDesc>
        <biblStruct>
          <monogr>
            <author>
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                <surname>Thrale</surname>
              </persName>
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            <imprint>
              <publisher>Katharine C. Balderston</publisher>
              <pubPlace>Oxford</pubPlace>
              <date>1951</date>
            </imprint>
            <availability/>
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        </biblStruct>
      </sourceDesc>
      <notesStmt>
        <note>xml/ukred-22947.xml</note>
      </notesStmt>
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            <surname/>
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    <experienceDesc>
      <experience ref="ukred-22947">
        <respStmt resp="submitter">
          <resp>submitted by</resp>
          <persName>
            <forename>Sarah</forename>
            <surname>Johnson</surname>
          </persName>
          <address>
            <address_line/>
          </address>
          <email>saj28@cam.ac.uk</email>
        </respStmt>
        <respStmt resp="editor"/>
        <date to="1778-12-31" cert="unknown">   - Dec 31 1778</date>
        <time/>
        <reader>
          <persName>
            <forename>Hester Lynch</forename>
            <surname>Thrale</surname>
          </persName>
          <sex>F</sex>
          <age>Adult (18-100+)</age>
          <education scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/education"/>
          <birth>1741-01-27</birth>
          <country>Wales</country>
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          <author>
            <persName>
              <forename>Jonathan</forename>
              <surname>Swift</surname>
            </persName>
          </author>
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          <textStatus ref="TST4" scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_status">Unknown</textStatus>
          <textForm scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_form" ref="TFO24">Serial/periodical</textForm>
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            <language/>
          </origLanguage>
          <textStatus scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/text_status"/>
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        <readingExp>
          <experienceType scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/experience_type" ref="EXT13">Unknown</experienceType>
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          <sourceReliability scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/source_reliability"/>
          <expFrequency scheme="http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/thesaurus/experience_frequency" ref="EXF3">Unknown</expFrequency>
          <note>This is probably the right poem, though it seems he wrote several on the South Sea Bubble</note>
        </readingExp>
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    </experienceDesc>
  </teiHeader>
  <text>
    <body>
      <div type="volume" n="I">
        <p>
          <ptr target="ukred-22947">"The two [italics] wittiest [end italics] things in our Language in Verse &amp; Prose are Dr Young"s Conjectures on Original Composition I think, and Dr Swift"s Ballad on the South Sea.

The two Tragedies which go nearest one"s Heart I think - in our Language I mean - are Southern"s Fatal Marriage and Lillo"s Fatal Curiosity.

The two best Comic Scenes in our Language according to my Taste are the Scene between Squire Richard &amp; Myrtilla in the Provoked Husband, and that between Sir Joseph Wittol, Nol Bluff and Sharper in the Old Batchelor - not the kicking scene but the friendly one.

The two best [italics] Declamatory [end italics] Scenes where the Sentiments and Language are most perfect, seem to be the Scene between Juba and Syphax in Addison"s Cato, &amp; that between the two Ladies in Johnson"s Irene. I know that both are unDramatic, the latter more peculiarly so, than ever was, or ever ought to have been hazarded - but for Language &amp; Sentiment it is most Superb. - Superieure as the French say.

Johnson says the finest Tragic Scene in our Language, for Drama sentiment, Language, Power over the Heart, &amp; every Requisite for Theatre or Closet, is the Tomb Scene in the Mourning Bride.
[italics] I [end italics] think, that trying to be [italics] every [end italics] thing it escapes being [italics] anything [end italics]"


</ptr>
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