The Spectator

Reading experience

?itemComments

The Spectator

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-22512

Evidence

"The other day some people from “The Gentlewoman” came to interview me and wished to put an account if me into their paper. I hate being public property and so refused though I acknowledged their kind intentions & the compliment they had paid me. If I once give myself into the hands of such people I shall not be able to breathe without the Editorial watch being produced to count the seconds – and I can’t live with the grip of the public ranter on my poor little wrist. I shall either long for it to tighten & deteriorate in consequence, or the publicity will make me die of shyness. I talked to the good ladies (who were much astonished that anyone would refuse to be set out in their excellent magazine), but remained firm - & they had to retire with no more ink wasted on their huge mss. They brought large enough books for their notes – poor things and it was a cold day. . . The Spectator I see is one of the adverse critics on my little Urmi. They cannot understand the Indian language naturally – and I think perhaps they are a bit angry about an Indian getting into so good a Magazine. They wish “if Indians are to take a part in our literature that they would do something separate” – Bosh! What red-Tafeism – as if we contaminate their literature. They say too it is “hardly local” – because any woman might feel the same. I daresay they fancy that because Indian women are not English they can’t have any nice feelings as to their ties to their husbands or to their children. However I don’t mind for they abuse Mr Knowles in the same paper."

Source


Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO24
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Sorabji, Cornelia
Born in 1866

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Cornelia Sorabji, lawyer and author, had her earliest articles published in 'The Nineteenth Century', whose editor was Mr Knowles. She was suffciently unique in London society - with her colourful silk saris, her professional ambitions and her literary contributions - to be the prospective subject of an interview by the hapless female writers for 'The Gentlewoman' in the extract quoted.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:


http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/80597
Accessed on 2022/09/26 21:41:06

Related place
England
Related person
Related place
England
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?itemComments

The Spectator

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-22512

Evidence

"The other day some people from “The Gentlewoman” came to interview me and wished to put an account if me into their paper. I hate being public property and so refused though I acknowledged their kind intentions & the compliment they had paid me. If I once give myself into the hands of such people I shall not be able to breathe without the Editorial watch being produced to count the seconds – and I can’t live with the grip of the public ranter on my poor little wrist. I shall either long for it to tighten & deteriorate in consequence, or the publicity will make me die of shyness. I talked to the good ladies (who were much astonished that anyone would refuse to be set out in their excellent magazine), but remained firm - & they had to retire with no more ink wasted on their huge mss. They brought large enough books for their notes – poor things and it was a cold day. . . The Spectator I see is one of the adverse critics on my little Urmi. They cannot understand the Indian language naturally – and I think perhaps they are a bit angry about an Indian getting into so good a Magazine. They wish “if Indians are to take a part in our literature that they would do something separate” – Bosh! What red-Tafeism – as if we contaminate their literature. They say too it is “hardly local” – because any woman might feel the same. I daresay they fancy that because Indian women are not English they can’t have any nice feelings as to their ties to their husbands or to their children. However I don’t mind for they abuse Mr Knowles in the same paper."

Source


Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO24
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Sorabji, Cornelia
Born in 1866

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Cornelia Sorabji, lawyer and author, had her earliest articles published in 'The Nineteenth Century', whose editor was Mr Knowles. She was suffciently unique in London society - with her colourful silk saris, her professional ambitions and her literary contributions - to be the prospective subject of an interview by the hapless female writers for 'The Gentlewoman' in the extract quoted.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:


http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/80597
Accessed on 2022/09/26 21:41:06

Related place
England
Related person
Related place
England
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        <p>
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