texts used in teaching self to read

Reading experience

?itemComments

texts used in teaching self to read

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-21819

Evidence

"At the end of the year [1855] an unknown Nottingham artizan [sic] came to call. My father asked him to dinner and at his request read ""Maud."" It appears that the poor man had sent his poems beforehand. They had been acknowledged, but had not been returned, and had been forgotten. He was informed that the poems, thus sent, were always looked at, although my father and mother had not time to pass judgement on them. A most pathetic incident of this kind, my father told me, happened to him at Twickenham, when a Waterloo soldier brought twelve large cantos on the battle of Waterloo. The veteran had actually taught himself in his old age to read and write that he might thus commemorate Wellington"s great victory. The epic lay for some time under the sofa in my father"s study, and was a source of much anxiety to him. How could he go through such a vast poem? One day he mustered up courage and took a portion out. It opened on the head of a canto: ""The Angels encamped above the field of Waterloo."" On that day, at least, he ""read no more."" He gave the author, when he called for his manuscript, this criticism: ""Though great images loom here and there, your poem could not be published as a whole."" The old man answered nothing, wrapt up each of the twelve cantos carefully, placed them in a strong oak case and carried them off. He was asked to come again but he never came."

Source

Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO27
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)



Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes


How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/79403
Accessed on 2019/12/10 10:28:13

Related person
Related text or manuscript
Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
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?itemComments

texts used in teaching self to read

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-21819

Evidence

"At the end of the year [1855] an unknown Nottingham artizan [sic] came to call. My father asked him to dinner and at his request read ""Maud."" It appears that the poor man had sent his poems beforehand. They had been acknowledged, but had not been returned, and had been forgotten. He was informed that the poems, thus sent, were always looked at, although my father and mother had not time to pass judgement on them. A most pathetic incident of this kind, my father told me, happened to him at Twickenham, when a Waterloo soldier brought twelve large cantos on the battle of Waterloo. The veteran had actually taught himself in his old age to read and write that he might thus commemorate Wellington"s great victory. The epic lay for some time under the sofa in my father"s study, and was a source of much anxiety to him. How could he go through such a vast poem? One day he mustered up courage and took a portion out. It opened on the head of a canto: ""The Angels encamped above the field of Waterloo."" On that day, at least, he ""read no more."" He gave the author, when he called for his manuscript, this criticism: ""Though great images loom here and there, your poem could not be published as a whole."" The old man answered nothing, wrapt up each of the twelve cantos carefully, placed them in a strong oak case and carried them off. He was asked to come again but he never came."

Source

Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO27
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)



Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes


How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/79403
Accessed on 2019/12/10 10:28:13

Related person
Related text or manuscript
Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son
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