[poems]

Reading experience

?itemComments

[poems]

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-21709

Evidence

"In the afternoon I tried to get Dr. Johnson to like the Poems of Mr. Hamilton of Bangour, which I had brought with me: I had been much pleased with them at a very early age; the impression still remained on my mind; it was confirmed by the opinion of my friend the Honourable Andrew Erskine, himself both a good poet and a good critick, who thought Hamilton as true a poet as ever wrote, and that his not having fame was unaccountable. Johnson, upon repeated occasions, while I was at Ashbourne, talked slightingly of Hamilton. He said there was no power of thinking in his verses, nothing that strikes one, nothing better than what you generally find in magazines; and that the highest praise they deserved was, that they were very well for a gentleman to hand about among his friends. He said the imitation of ""Ne sit ancillae tibi amor"", &c. was too solemn; he read part of it at the beginning. He read the beautiful pathetick song, "Ah the poor shepherd"s mournful fate", and did not seem to give attention to what I had been used to think tender elegant strains, but laughed at the rhyme, in Scotch pronunciation, [italics] wishes [end italics] and [italics] blushes [end italics], reading [italics] wushes [end italics]--and there he stopped. He owned that the epitaph on Lord Newhall was pretty well done. He read the "Inscription in a Summer-house", and a little of the imitations of Horace"s "Epistles"; but said he found nothing to make him desire to read on. When I urged that there were some good poetical passages in the book. ""Where (said he,) will you find so large a collection without some?"" I thought the description of Winter might obtain his approbation: "See Winter, from the frozen north Drives his iron chariot forth! His grisly hand in icy chains Fair Tweeda"s silver flood constrains," &c. He asked why an "iron chariot"? and said "icy chains" was an old image. I was struck with the uncertainty of taste, and somewhat sorry that a poet whom I had long read with fondness, was not approved by Dr. Johnson. I comforted myself with thinking that the beauties were too delicate for his robust perceptions".

Source

Life of Johnson

Text being read

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Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Erskine, Andrew
Born in 2016

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
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EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Originally published 1791.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Life of Johnson
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/79219
Accessed on 2019/09/21 02:50:41

Related people
Erskine, Andrew
Related text or manuscript
Life of Johnson
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"See Winter, from the frozen north  
Drives his iron chariot forth! 
His grisly hand in icy chains 
Fair Tweeda"s silver flood constrains," &amp;c. 

He asked why an "iron chariot"? and said "icy chains" was an old image. I was struck with the uncertainty of taste, and somewhat sorry that a poet whom I had long read with fondness, was not approved by Dr. Johnson. I comforted myself with thinking that the beauties were too delicate for his robust perceptions".


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[poems]

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-21709

Evidence

"In the afternoon I tried to get Dr. Johnson to like the Poems of Mr. Hamilton of Bangour, which I had brought with me: I had been much pleased with them at a very early age; the impression still remained on my mind; it was confirmed by the opinion of my friend the Honourable Andrew Erskine, himself both a good poet and a good critick, who thought Hamilton as true a poet as ever wrote, and that his not having fame was unaccountable. Johnson, upon repeated occasions, while I was at Ashbourne, talked slightingly of Hamilton. He said there was no power of thinking in his verses, nothing that strikes one, nothing better than what you generally find in magazines; and that the highest praise they deserved was, that they were very well for a gentleman to hand about among his friends. He said the imitation of ""Ne sit ancillae tibi amor"", &c. was too solemn; he read part of it at the beginning. He read the beautiful pathetick song, "Ah the poor shepherd"s mournful fate", and did not seem to give attention to what I had been used to think tender elegant strains, but laughed at the rhyme, in Scotch pronunciation, [italics] wishes [end italics] and [italics] blushes [end italics], reading [italics] wushes [end italics]--and there he stopped. He owned that the epitaph on Lord Newhall was pretty well done. He read the "Inscription in a Summer-house", and a little of the imitations of Horace"s "Epistles"; but said he found nothing to make him desire to read on. When I urged that there were some good poetical passages in the book. ""Where (said he,) will you find so large a collection without some?"" I thought the description of Winter might obtain his approbation: "See Winter, from the frozen north Drives his iron chariot forth! His grisly hand in icy chains Fair Tweeda"s silver flood constrains," &c. He asked why an "iron chariot"? and said "icy chains" was an old image. I was struck with the uncertainty of taste, and somewhat sorry that a poet whom I had long read with fondness, was not approved by Dr. Johnson. I comforted myself with thinking that the beauties were too delicate for his robust perceptions".

Source

Life of Johnson

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Erskine, Andrew
Born in 2016

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Originally published 1791.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Life of Johnson
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/79219
Accessed on 2019/09/21 02:50:41

Related people
Erskine, Andrew
Related text or manuscript
Life of Johnson
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"See Winter, from the frozen north  
Drives his iron chariot forth! 
His grisly hand in icy chains 
Fair Tweeda"s silver flood constrains," &amp;c. 

He asked why an "iron chariot"? and said "icy chains" was an old image. I was struck with the uncertainty of taste, and somewhat sorry that a poet whom I had long read with fondness, was not approved by Dr. Johnson. I comforted myself with thinking that the beauties were too delicate for his robust perceptions".


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