Poems

Reading experience

?itemComments

Poems

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-21437

Evidence

Elizabeth Gaskell to John Forster, on presentation of inscribed copy of Tennyson"s poems to Samuel Bamford, 7 December 1849: "I have not yet taken my bonnet off after hunting up Bamford. First of all we went to Blakeley to his little white-washed cottage. His wife was cleaning, and regretted her ""master"" was not at home. He had gone into Manchester [...] At last we pounced upon the great gray stalwart man coming out of a little old-fashioned public-house where Blakeley people put up. Whe I produced my book he said, ""This is grand."" I said, ""Look at the title-page,"" for I saw he was fairly caught by something he liked in the middle of the book, and was standing reading it in the street. ""Well, I am a proud man this day!"" he exclaimed. Then he turned it up and down and read a bit (it was a very crowded street) and his gray face went quite brown-red with pleasure. Suddenly he stopped. ""What must I do for him back again?"" ""Oh! you must write to him, and thank him."" ""I"d rather walk 20 mile than write a letter any day."" ""Well then, suppose you set off this Christmas, and walk and thank Tennyson."" He looked up from his book, right in my face, quite indignant. ""Woman! walking won"t reach him. We"re on the earth don"t ye see, but he"s there, up above. I can no more reach him by walking than if he were an eagle or a skylark high above my head."" It came fresh, warm, straight from the heart, without a notion of making a figurative speech [...] Then he dipped down again into his book, and began reading aloud the ""Sleeping Beauty,"" and in the middle stopped to look at the writing again. And we left him in a sort of sleep-walking state, and only trust he will not be run over."

Source

Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR207

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Bamford, Samuel
Aged 61 [Experience in 1849, born in 1788]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
December 7 1849
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
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EuRED : experience frequency
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Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
On 8 Oct 1849, Gaskell wrote to Forster to tell him of how she had heard that Bamford knew many of Tennyson's poems by heart, and recited them to himself for comfort when he could not sleep at night. She went on to relate: 'I asked him the other day if he had got them of his own. ""No,"" he said rather mournfully: he had been long looking out for a second-hand copy, but somehow they had not got into the old book-shops, and 14s or 18s (which are they) was too much for a poor man' (p.283 in source). Forster complied with Gaskell's subsequent request that he ask Tennyson to buy and sign a copy of the Poems for Bamford; Tennyson wrote back to Forster with his consent to the plan, also remarking: 'I reckon his [Bamford's] admiration is the highest honour I have yet received' (p.284 in source). See pp.285-86 for Bamford's own letter of thanks to Tennyson.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/78734
Accessed on 2019/12/06 22:38:20

Related place
England
Related people
Bamford, Samuel
Related text or manuscript
Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son
Related place
England
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Forster complied with Gaskell's subsequent request that he ask Tennyson to buy and sign a copy of the Poems for Bamford; Tennyson wrote back to Forster with his consent to the plan, also remarking: 'I reckon his [Bamford's] admiration is the highest honour I have yet received' (p.284 in source). 

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"I have not yet taken my bonnet off after hunting up Bamford. First of all we went to Blakeley to his little white-washed cottage. His wife was cleaning, and regretted her ""master"" was not at home. He had gone into Manchester [...] At last we pounced upon the great gray stalwart man coming out of a little old-fashioned public-house where Blakeley people put up. Whe I produced my book he said, ""This is grand."" I said, ""Look at the title-page,"" for I saw he was fairly caught by something he liked in the middle of the book, and was standing reading it in the street. ""Well, I am a proud man this day!"" he exclaimed. Then he turned it up and down and read a bit (it was a very crowded street) and his gray face went quite brown-red with pleasure. Suddenly he stopped. ""What must I do for him back again?"" ""Oh! you must write to him, and thank him."" ""I"d rather walk 20 mile than write a letter any day."" ""Well then, suppose you set off this Christmas, and walk and thank Tennyson."" He looked up from his book, right in my face, quite indignant.  ""Woman! walking won"t reach him. We"re on the earth don"t ye see, but he"s there, up above. I can no more reach him by walking than if he were an eagle or a skylark high above my head."" It came fresh, warm, straight from the heart, without a notion of making a figurative speech [...] Then he dipped down again into his book, and began reading aloud the ""Sleeping Beauty,"" and in the middle stopped to look at the writing again. And we left him in a sort of sleep-walking state, and only trust he will not be run over."</ptr>
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?itemComments

Poems

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-21437

Evidence

Elizabeth Gaskell to John Forster, on presentation of inscribed copy of Tennyson"s poems to Samuel Bamford, 7 December 1849: "I have not yet taken my bonnet off after hunting up Bamford. First of all we went to Blakeley to his little white-washed cottage. His wife was cleaning, and regretted her ""master"" was not at home. He had gone into Manchester [...] At last we pounced upon the great gray stalwart man coming out of a little old-fashioned public-house where Blakeley people put up. Whe I produced my book he said, ""This is grand."" I said, ""Look at the title-page,"" for I saw he was fairly caught by something he liked in the middle of the book, and was standing reading it in the street. ""Well, I am a proud man this day!"" he exclaimed. Then he turned it up and down and read a bit (it was a very crowded street) and his gray face went quite brown-red with pleasure. Suddenly he stopped. ""What must I do for him back again?"" ""Oh! you must write to him, and thank him."" ""I"d rather walk 20 mile than write a letter any day."" ""Well then, suppose you set off this Christmas, and walk and thank Tennyson."" He looked up from his book, right in my face, quite indignant. ""Woman! walking won"t reach him. We"re on the earth don"t ye see, but he"s there, up above. I can no more reach him by walking than if he were an eagle or a skylark high above my head."" It came fresh, warm, straight from the heart, without a notion of making a figurative speech [...] Then he dipped down again into his book, and began reading aloud the ""Sleeping Beauty,"" and in the middle stopped to look at the writing again. And we left him in a sort of sleep-walking state, and only trust he will not be run over."

Source

Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR207

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Bamford, Samuel
Aged 61 [Experience in 1849, born in 1788]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
December 7 1849
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT113
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
On 8 Oct 1849, Gaskell wrote to Forster to tell him of how she had heard that Bamford knew many of Tennyson's poems by heart, and recited them to himself for comfort when he could not sleep at night. She went on to relate: 'I asked him the other day if he had got them of his own. ""No,"" he said rather mournfully: he had been long looking out for a second-hand copy, but somehow they had not got into the old book-shops, and 14s or 18s (which are they) was too much for a poor man' (p.283 in source). Forster complied with Gaskell's subsequent request that he ask Tennyson to buy and sign a copy of the Poems for Bamford; Tennyson wrote back to Forster with his consent to the plan, also remarking: 'I reckon his [Bamford's] admiration is the highest honour I have yet received' (p.284 in source). See pp.285-86 for Bamford's own letter of thanks to Tennyson.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/78734
Accessed on 2019/12/06 22:38:20

Related place
England
Related people
Bamford, Samuel
Related text or manuscript
Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir by His Son
Related place
England
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'I asked him the other day if he had got them of his own. ""No,"" he said rather mournfully: he had been long looking out for a second-hand copy, but somehow they had not got into the old book-shops, and 14s or 18s (which are they) was too much for a poor man' (p.283 in source).

Forster complied with Gaskell's subsequent request that he ask Tennyson to buy and sign a copy of the Poems for Bamford; Tennyson wrote back to Forster with his consent to the plan, also remarking: 'I reckon his [Bamford's] admiration is the highest honour I have yet received' (p.284 in source). 

See pp.285-86 for Bamford's own letter of thanks to Tennyson.</note>
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          <ptr target="ukred-21437">Elizabeth Gaskell to John Forster, on presentation of inscribed copy of Tennyson"s poems to Samuel Bamford, 7 December 1849:

"I have not yet taken my bonnet off after hunting up Bamford. First of all we went to Blakeley to his little white-washed cottage. His wife was cleaning, and regretted her ""master"" was not at home. He had gone into Manchester [...] At last we pounced upon the great gray stalwart man coming out of a little old-fashioned public-house where Blakeley people put up. Whe I produced my book he said, ""This is grand."" I said, ""Look at the title-page,"" for I saw he was fairly caught by something he liked in the middle of the book, and was standing reading it in the street. ""Well, I am a proud man this day!"" he exclaimed. Then he turned it up and down and read a bit (it was a very crowded street) and his gray face went quite brown-red with pleasure. Suddenly he stopped. ""What must I do for him back again?"" ""Oh! you must write to him, and thank him."" ""I"d rather walk 20 mile than write a letter any day."" ""Well then, suppose you set off this Christmas, and walk and thank Tennyson."" He looked up from his book, right in my face, quite indignant.  ""Woman! walking won"t reach him. We"re on the earth don"t ye see, but he"s there, up above. I can no more reach him by walking than if he were an eagle or a skylark high above my head."" It came fresh, warm, straight from the heart, without a notion of making a figurative speech [...] Then he dipped down again into his book, and began reading aloud the ""Sleeping Beauty,"" and in the middle stopped to look at the writing again. And we left him in a sort of sleep-walking state, and only trust he will not be run over."</ptr>
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