History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia

Reading experience

?itemComments

History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-20823

Evidence

"This Tale [""Rasselas""], with all the charms of oriental imagery, and all the force and beauty of which the English language is capable, leads us through the most important scenes of human life, and shews us that this stage of our being is full of ""vanity and vexation of spirit"". [Boswell comments on its value] Voltaire"s ""Candide"", written to refute the system of Optimism, which it has accomplished with brilliant success, is wonderfully similar in its plan and conduct to Johnson"s ""Rasselas""; insomuch, that I have heard Johnson say, that if they had not been published so closely one after the other that there was not time for imitation, it would have been vain to deny that the scheme of that which came latest was taken from the other. Though the proposition illustrated by both these works was the same, namely, that in our present state there is more evil than good, the intention of the writers was very different. Voltaire, I am afraid, meant only by wanton profanness to obtain a sportive victory over religion, and to discredit the belief of a superintending Providence: Johnson meant, by shewing the unsatisfactory nature of things temporal, to direct the hopes of man to things eternal".

Source

Life of Johnson

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Boswell, James
Aged 19-51 [Experience was between 1759 and 1791, born in 1740]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
1759 - 1791
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Originally published 1791.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Life of Johnson
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/77639
Accessed on 2019/09/18 17:37:54

Related people
Boswell, James
Related text or manuscript
Life of Johnson
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?itemComments

History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-20823

Evidence

"This Tale [""Rasselas""], with all the charms of oriental imagery, and all the force and beauty of which the English language is capable, leads us through the most important scenes of human life, and shews us that this stage of our being is full of ""vanity and vexation of spirit"". [Boswell comments on its value] Voltaire"s ""Candide"", written to refute the system of Optimism, which it has accomplished with brilliant success, is wonderfully similar in its plan and conduct to Johnson"s ""Rasselas""; insomuch, that I have heard Johnson say, that if they had not been published so closely one after the other that there was not time for imitation, it would have been vain to deny that the scheme of that which came latest was taken from the other. Though the proposition illustrated by both these works was the same, namely, that in our present state there is more evil than good, the intention of the writers was very different. Voltaire, I am afraid, meant only by wanton profanness to obtain a sportive victory over religion, and to discredit the belief of a superintending Providence: Johnson meant, by shewing the unsatisfactory nature of things temporal, to direct the hopes of man to things eternal".

Source

Life of Johnson

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Boswell, James
Aged 19-51 [Experience was between 1759 and 1791, born in 1740]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
1759 - 1791
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Originally published 1791.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Life of Johnson
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/77639
Accessed on 2019/09/18 17:37:54

Related people
Boswell, James
Related text or manuscript
Life of Johnson
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