His Monkey wife; or, Married to a Chimp

Reading experience

?itemComments

His Monkey wife; or, Married to a Chimp

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-19661

Evidence

"His Monkey Wife isn"t a work of talent; it is a work of genius - or the word genius doesn"t mean anything. Anyhow, it is what I know to be genius. And I feel badly that I have only read it in its third impression........I don"t think I know a work that contains more wisdom and more terifying and destructive wit. The word ""wit"" has been debased from meaning Swift to meaning that wretched buffoon Noel Coward. But you have wit as Swift understood it.........I don"t think anything is left to be said now either about men"s attitude towards women, or about women"s inmost thoughts. I have always liked you very much but I think you are a most terrifying young man. How on earth do you know so much! I"m overwhelmed by the scope of the book, and its most apalling insight... Honestly, as exposing the point of view of a man towards an accustomed woman, and of the secret view a woman takes of herself, I don"t know anything to touch the fancy dress ball scene...."

Source

Selected letters of Edith Sitwell

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR207

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Sitwell, Edith
Aged 44 [Experience in 1931, born in 1887]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
January 1 - June 14 1931
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
This is an extract from a letter to the author of the Novel dated 14th Jan 1931. I have only included parts of Edith's comments on the Novel that relate to it's content. Much of the letter repeats her praise of the author as a ""genius"". As with many of Edith's letters her effusive praise could be construed as being directly related to the extent to which she could personally identify with their 'message'. If the book is about an old fashioned female in a modern world this is a description which could be said to suit Edith quite well. It is also worth noting that she takes the opportunity of a snipe at Noel Coward who had offended her greatly by his caricature of Facade.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Selected letters of Edith Sitwell
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/75771
Accessed on 2020/10/30 08:35:45

Related place
England
Related people
Sitwell, Edith
Related text or manuscript
Selected letters of Edith Sitwell
Related place
England
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        <ptr target="ukred-19661">"His Monkey Wife isn"t a work of talent; it is a work of genius - or the word genius doesn"t mean anything. Anyhow, it is what I know to be genius. And I feel badly that I have only read it in its third impression........I don"t think I know a work that contains more wisdom and more terifying and destructive wit. The word ""wit"" has been debased from meaning Swift to meaning that wretched buffoon Noel Coward. But you have wit as Swift understood it.........I don"t think anything is left to be said now either about men"s attitude towards women, or about women"s inmost thoughts. I have always liked  you very much but I think you are a most terrifying young man. How on earth do you know so much! I"m overwhelmed by the scope of the book, and its most apalling insight...  Honestly, as exposing the point of view of a man towards an accustomed woman, and of the secret view a woman takes of herself, I don"t know anything to touch the fancy dress ball scene...."</ptr>
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?itemComments

His Monkey wife; or, Married to a Chimp

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-19661

Evidence

"His Monkey Wife isn"t a work of talent; it is a work of genius - or the word genius doesn"t mean anything. Anyhow, it is what I know to be genius. And I feel badly that I have only read it in its third impression........I don"t think I know a work that contains more wisdom and more terifying and destructive wit. The word ""wit"" has been debased from meaning Swift to meaning that wretched buffoon Noel Coward. But you have wit as Swift understood it.........I don"t think anything is left to be said now either about men"s attitude towards women, or about women"s inmost thoughts. I have always liked you very much but I think you are a most terrifying young man. How on earth do you know so much! I"m overwhelmed by the scope of the book, and its most apalling insight... Honestly, as exposing the point of view of a man towards an accustomed woman, and of the secret view a woman takes of herself, I don"t know anything to touch the fancy dress ball scene...."

Source

Selected letters of Edith Sitwell

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR207

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Sitwell, Edith
Aged 44 [Experience in 1931, born in 1887]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
January 1 - June 14 1931
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
England
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
This is an extract from a letter to the author of the Novel dated 14th Jan 1931. I have only included parts of Edith's comments on the Novel that relate to it's content. Much of the letter repeats her praise of the author as a ""genius"". As with many of Edith's letters her effusive praise could be construed as being directly related to the extent to which she could personally identify with their 'message'. If the book is about an old fashioned female in a modern world this is a description which could be said to suit Edith quite well. It is also worth noting that she takes the opportunity of a snipe at Noel Coward who had offended her greatly by his caricature of Facade.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Selected letters of Edith Sitwell
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/75771
Accessed on 2020/10/30 08:35:45

Related place
England
Related people
Sitwell, Edith
Related text or manuscript
Selected letters of Edith Sitwell
Related place
England
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          <note>This is an extract from a letter to the author of the Novel dated 14th Jan 1931. I have only included parts of Edith's comments on the Novel that relate to it's content. Much of the letter repeats her praise of the author as a ""genius"". As with many of Edith's letters her effusive praise could be construed as being directly related to the extent to which she could personally identify with their 'message'. If the book is about an old fashioned female in a modern world this is a description which could be said to suit Edith quite well. It is also worth noting that she takes the opportunity of a snipe at Noel Coward who had offended her greatly by his caricature of Facade.</note>
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        <ptr target="ukred-19661">"His Monkey Wife isn"t a work of talent; it is a work of genius - or the word genius doesn"t mean anything. Anyhow, it is what I know to be genius. And I feel badly that I have only read it in its third impression........I don"t think I know a work that contains more wisdom and more terifying and destructive wit. The word ""wit"" has been debased from meaning Swift to meaning that wretched buffoon Noel Coward. But you have wit as Swift understood it.........I don"t think anything is left to be said now either about men"s attitude towards women, or about women"s inmost thoughts. I have always liked  you very much but I think you are a most terrifying young man. How on earth do you know so much! I"m overwhelmed by the scope of the book, and its most apalling insight...  Honestly, as exposing the point of view of a man towards an accustomed woman, and of the secret view a woman takes of herself, I don"t know anything to touch the fancy dress ball scene...."</ptr>
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