Reginald Dalton

Reading experience

?itemComments

Reginald Dalton

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-18901

Evidence

"I have read Reginald with great care and with great interest. It is a masterly work upon the whole, particularly in stile grouping and plot. In these its excellencies lie, and they are of a high class. But it strikes me that so masterly an architect might have made a far more imposing fabric on the whole. Its faults are these. A damned affectation of inserting short classical and French quotations without end and without measure which to common readers like me hurts the work materially - The work is too long for the materials two volumes would have been rather so - The plot is an excellent plot. I have seen nothing better concieved in the present age, and every thing bears upon it turning on it as a hinge. The author has prodigious merit in the conception of the plot, and therefore it is the greater pity that there is some manifest defects in the conducting of it. The final event is far too soon seen. From the moment that the Vicar tells the story of his sister-in-law"s seduction it is palpable. I saw it perfectly, and my chief interest afterwards was incited by my anxiety to see how the author was going to bring it about. This is Sir W. Scott"s plan, but it is not to be made a precedent of. In fact it will not do with any body but himself to let the events be seen perfectly through. However he could not have conceived such a true dramatic plot, all so perfecty in bearing; that he could not; but he could have made more of the characters and incidents; a great deal more. There is a fascination in the stile and in the abstract ideas that often delights me. The hand of a master is apparent there; and after all I think the sole failure is in the conducting of the plot, which you may depend on it will hurt the popularity of a grand work. There was great scope for pathos in it- there is not an item - several scenes of powerful impression seem just approaching - they pass over without taking due effect; and besides, the leaving out of the Christian name in the will was a misnomer unlikely enough for so much to hinge upon [Hogg critiques some further aspects of the plot].

Source

Collected Letters of James Hogg, The

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Hogg, James
Aged 53 [Experience in 1823, born in 1770]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
June 7 - 18 1823
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
Scotland
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Letter to William Blackwood, the work's publisher. Hogg goes on to say how he could have written the novel better and to speculate on its future sales and audience.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Collected Letters of James Hogg, The
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/74423
Accessed on 2020/11/28 05:53:14

Related place
Scotland
Related people
Hogg, James
Related text or manuscript
Collected Letters of James Hogg, The
Related place
Scotland
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?itemComments

Reginald Dalton

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-18901

Evidence

"I have read Reginald with great care and with great interest. It is a masterly work upon the whole, particularly in stile grouping and plot. In these its excellencies lie, and they are of a high class. But it strikes me that so masterly an architect might have made a far more imposing fabric on the whole. Its faults are these. A damned affectation of inserting short classical and French quotations without end and without measure which to common readers like me hurts the work materially - The work is too long for the materials two volumes would have been rather so - The plot is an excellent plot. I have seen nothing better concieved in the present age, and every thing bears upon it turning on it as a hinge. The author has prodigious merit in the conception of the plot, and therefore it is the greater pity that there is some manifest defects in the conducting of it. The final event is far too soon seen. From the moment that the Vicar tells the story of his sister-in-law"s seduction it is palpable. I saw it perfectly, and my chief interest afterwards was incited by my anxiety to see how the author was going to bring it about. This is Sir W. Scott"s plan, but it is not to be made a precedent of. In fact it will not do with any body but himself to let the events be seen perfectly through. However he could not have conceived such a true dramatic plot, all so perfecty in bearing; that he could not; but he could have made more of the characters and incidents; a great deal more. There is a fascination in the stile and in the abstract ideas that often delights me. The hand of a master is apparent there; and after all I think the sole failure is in the conducting of the plot, which you may depend on it will hurt the popularity of a grand work. There was great scope for pathos in it- there is not an item - several scenes of powerful impression seem just approaching - they pass over without taking due effect; and besides, the leaving out of the Christian name in the will was a misnomer unlikely enough for so much to hinge upon [Hogg critiques some further aspects of the plot].

Source

Collected Letters of James Hogg, The

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR215

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Hogg, James
Aged 53 [Experience in 1823, born in 1770]

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
June 7 - 18 1823
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF3
Place of reading experience
Scotland
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes
Letter to William Blackwood, the work's publisher. Hogg goes on to say how he could have written the novel better and to speculate on its future sales and audience.

How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

Collected Letters of James Hogg, The
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/74423
Accessed on 2020/11/28 05:53:14

Related place
Scotland
Related people
Hogg, James
Related text or manuscript
Collected Letters of James Hogg, The
Related place
Scotland
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          <ptr target="ukred-18901">"I have read Reginald with great care and with great interest. It is a masterly work upon the whole, particularly in stile grouping and plot. In these its excellencies lie, and they are of a high class. But it strikes me that so masterly an architect might have made a far more imposing fabric on the whole. Its faults are these. A damned affectation of inserting short classical and French quotations without end and without measure which to common readers like me hurts the work materially - The work is too long for the materials two volumes would have been rather so - The plot is an excellent plot. I have seen nothing better concieved in the present age, and every thing bears upon it turning on it as a hinge. The author has prodigious merit in the conception of the plot, and therefore it is the greater pity that there is some manifest defects in the conducting of it. The final event is far too soon seen. From the moment that the Vicar tells the story of his sister-in-law"s seduction it is palpable. I saw it perfectly, and my chief interest afterwards was incited by my anxiety to see how the author was going to bring it about. This is Sir W. Scott"s plan, but it is not to be made a precedent of. In fact it will not do with any body but himself to let the events be seen perfectly through. However he could not have conceived such a true dramatic plot, all so perfecty in bearing; that he could not; but he could have made more of the characters and incidents; a great deal more. There is a fascination in the stile and in the abstract ideas that often delights me. The hand of a master is apparent there; and after all I think the sole failure is in the conducting of the plot, which you may depend on it will hurt the popularity of a grand work. There was great scope for pathos in it- there is not an item - several scenes of powerful impression seem just approaching - they pass over without taking due effect; and besides, the leaving out of the Christian name in the will was a misnomer unlikely enough for so much to hinge upon [Hogg critiques some further aspects of the plot].</ptr>
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