Paradise Lost

Reading experience

?itemComments

Paradise Lost

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-17375

Evidence

[Marginalia in Keats"s annotated copy of ""Paradise Lost"" in Book 2, lines 546-61]: Keats underlines the following: the lines from "Others, more mild, /Retreated in a silent valley" to "By doom of battle"; "Their song was partial, but the harmony"; "Suspended Hell"; "in discourse more sweet/ (For eloquence the soul, song charms the sense)/ Others apart sat on a hill retired". He writes: "Milton is godlike in the sublime pathetic. In Demons, fallen Angels, and Monsters the delicacies of passion, living in and from their immortality, is of the most softening and dissolving nature. It is carried to the utmost here - ""Others more mild"" - nothing can express the sensation one feels at ""Their song was partial"" etc. Examples of this nature are divine to the utmost in other poets - in Caliban ""Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments"" etc. In Theocritus, Polyphemus, and Homer"s Hymn to Pan where Mercury is represented as taking his ""homely fac"d"" to heaven. There are numerous other instances in Milton - where Satan"s progeny is called his ""daughter dear"", and where this same Sin, a female, and with a feminine instinct for the showy and martial is in pain lest death should sully his bright arms, ""nor vainly hope to be invulnerable in those bright arms."" Another instance is ""pensive I sat alone"". We need not mention ""Tears such as Angels weep."""

Source

John Keats: The Complete Poems

Text being read

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Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Keats, John
Born in 1795

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
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EXF1
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EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
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Notes


How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

John Keats: The Complete Poems
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/72130
Accessed on 2020/01/23 00:25:27

Related place
Unknown
Related people
Keats, John
Related text or manuscript
John Keats: The Complete Poems
Related place
Unknown
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?itemComments

Paradise Lost

Reading experience
Identifer:
ukred-17375

Evidence

[Marginalia in Keats"s annotated copy of ""Paradise Lost"" in Book 2, lines 546-61]: Keats underlines the following: the lines from "Others, more mild, /Retreated in a silent valley" to "By doom of battle"; "Their song was partial, but the harmony"; "Suspended Hell"; "in discourse more sweet/ (For eloquence the soul, song charms the sense)/ Others apart sat on a hill retired". He writes: "Milton is godlike in the sublime pathetic. In Demons, fallen Angels, and Monsters the delicacies of passion, living in and from their immortality, is of the most softening and dissolving nature. It is carried to the utmost here - ""Others more mild"" - nothing can express the sensation one feels at ""Their song was partial"" etc. Examples of this nature are divine to the utmost in other poets - in Caliban ""Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments"" etc. In Theocritus, Polyphemus, and Homer"s Hymn to Pan where Mercury is represented as taking his ""homely fac"d"" to heaven. There are numerous other instances in Milton - where Satan"s progeny is called his ""daughter dear"", and where this same Sin, a female, and with a feminine instinct for the showy and martial is in pain lest death should sully his bright arms, ""nor vainly hope to be invulnerable in those bright arms."" Another instance is ""pensive I sat alone"". We need not mention ""Tears such as Angels weep."""

Source

John Keats: The Complete Poems

Text being read

EuRED : text status
TST4
EuRED : text form
TFO02
EuRED : text provenance
TPR207

Reader(s) and listener(s)

Reader
Keats, John
Born in 1795

Details of the reading experience

Date of Reading Experience
Time of Reading Experience
EuRED : experience type
EXT13
EuRED : experience frequency
EXF1
Place of reading experience
Unknown
EuRED : emotions
EuRED : intensity
EuRED : environment
EuRED : lighting
EuRED : testimony
EuRED : reliability
Notes


How to cite this record

You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission. Please ensure the following credit accompanies it:

John Keats: The Complete Poems
http://eured.univ-lemans.fr/dbworkshop/index.php/Detail/objects/72130
Accessed on 2020/01/23 00:25:27

Related place
Unknown
Related people
Keats, John
Related text or manuscript
John Keats: The Complete Poems
Related place
Unknown
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